Tag Archives: Barack Obama

White House Denies CIA Teleported Obama to Mars

By Spencer Ackerman via Wired.com

transpoter03Forget Kenya. Never mind the secret madrassas. The sinister, shocking truth about Barack Obama’s past lies not in east Africa, but in outer space. As a young man in the early 1980s, Obama was part of a secret CIA project to explore Mars. The future president teleported there, along with the future head of Darpa.

That’s the assertion, at least, of a pair of self-proclaimed time-traveling, universe-exploring government agents. Andrew D. Basiago and William Stillings insist that they once served as “chrononauts” at Darpa’s behest, traversing the boundaries of time and space. They swear: A youthful Barack Obama was one of them.

Perhaps this all sounds fantastical, absurd, and more than a little nuts. We couldn’t agree more. That’s one of the reasons we love conspiracy theories  — the more awesomely insane, the better. Each week during 2012, when the Mayans tell us to expect the apocalypse, Danger Room will peel back a new layer of crazy to expose those oh-so-cleverly hidden machinations powering this doomed plane of existence. Welcome — back — to Tinfoil Tuesday.

According to Basiago and Stillings, Obama isn’t just lying about his identity. He’s lying about his military service record, too. While his political opponents in 2008 attacked him for never serving, in truth, he was concealing his participation in a hidden CIA intergalactic program hosted at a California community college in 1980.

Officially, the White House says Obama never went to Mars. “Only if you count watching Marvin the Martian,” Tommy Vietor, the spokesman for the National Security Council, tells Danger Room. But that’s exactly what a secret chrononaut wants you to believe.

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10 People Who Claimed To Be Time Travelers

vortex 911
By Jackie Fuchs via Listverse

“The distinction between the past, present and future is only an illusion, however persistent.” –Albert Einstein

These days, even respected physicists like Stephen Hawking are being forced to admit that time travel may be possible. But has it already happened? These people say it has.

10 • A Visit To Mars With Barack Obama

163113514-e1387065394814_250pxSeattle attorney Andrew Basiago says that when he was a child, he and William Stillings were “chrononauts” in a secret United States government time travel program called Project Pegasus. The purpose of the program was threefold—to protect Earth from threats from space, to establish territorial sovereignty over Mars, and to acclimate Martian humanoids and animals to our presence.

The best part of Basiago’s and Stillings’ claim, however, is that one of their fellow time travelers was none other than a 19-year-old Barack Obama, who went by the name “Barry Soetero.” In 1980, the three men and seven other youths from their “Mars training class” at California’s College of the Siskiyous (a real institution) traveled to Mars via a top-secret teleportation “jump room” modeled on technical papers found in Nikola Tesla’s apartment after his death. They jumped through a field of radiant energy into a tunnel, and when the tunnel closed, found themselves at their destination.

The White House has officially denied that Obama ever went to Mars.

9 • An American Soldier From The Future

178803217-e1387065965310_250pxIn late 2000, posts began appearing on the Internet from someone claiming to be an American soldier from the year 2036. John Titor, as he called himself, was on his way back to 1975—using a device installed in a 1987 Chevy Suburban, naturally—to obtain an IBM 5100 computer to fight a computer virus destined to destroy the world. Titor hinted at a world beset by conflicts, culminating in a series of Russian nuclear strikes in 2015 that would kill almost three billion people.

Titor’s posts abruptly ceased in 2001, but Titormania continued. In 2003, a bound edition of Titor’s 151 message board posts was released under the title John Titor: A Time Traveler’s Tale. Though no longer in print, one can still buy a new copy for an eye-popping $1,775, or a used one at a more modest $150. The book was published by the John Titor Foundation, a for-profit corporation run by Florida entertainment attorney Lawrence Haber. The Foundation also owns the copyright to the purported insignia of Titor’s military unit, the Fighting Diamondbacks, which is inscribed with a quote from Ovid: tempus edax rerum, meaning “time devours all things.”

Except, it would seem, the myth of John Titor.

8 • Christ’s Personal Photographer

177729044-e1387066193469_250pxFather Pellegrino Ernetti was a Benedictine monk and respected authority on archaic music. He also claimed to have co-invented—as part of a team that included Nobel Prize-winning physicist Enrico Fermi and German rocket scientist Werner von Braun—the “chronovisor,” a device that looked like a television but could tune in to events from the past.

According to Ernetti, he had observed the last supper and Christ’s crucifixion, as well as Napoleon and Cicero. The team had later voluntarily dismantled the device, because in the wrong hands, it could create “the most fearsome dictatorship the world has ever seen.” It had been inspired, he said, by Nostradamus—who had personally related to him the device’s possibilities.

When pressed for evidence, Ernetti produced a picture of Christ on the cross reportedly photographed through the chronovisor. After the photo’s resemblance to a carving by Cullot Valera was noticed, however, Ernetti was forced to admit the photo was a fake. Nevertheless, Ernetti insisted the chronovisor was real.

7 • The Pilot Who Entered A Parallel Dimension

87779040-e1387066436503_250pxIn 1935, a wing commander with Britain’s Royal Air Force named Sir Victor Goddard flew his open-cockpit biplane from Scotland to England on weekend leave. On the way, he passed over Drem Airfield near Edinburgh, which had been constructed during World War I. The tarmac and four hangars were in disrepair and barbed wire divided the field into numerous pastures filled with grazing cattle. Returning home a day later, Goddard ran into a violent storm and lost control of his plane. When he finally recovered from a downward spiral that should have resulted in his death, he was just several feet above a stony beach.

As Goddard climbed back up through the rain and fog, the sky suddenly filled with sunlight. Below him was the Drem Airfield—only the farm had disappeared, and the hangars were no longer decrepit. At the end of the restored tarmac stood four bright yellow planes, one an unfamiliar monoplane. These were surrounded by mechanics in blue overalls, notable to Goddard since RAF mechanics only ever wore brown.

Had Goddard—considered one of the founders of the RAF—simply been confused about his location, as some skeptics suggest? Or had he traveled forward in time? Goddard died in 1987, so we may never know the truth. Unless, of course, he returns from the past to tell us.

6 • The Sole Survivor Of The Philadelphia Experiment

177444045_250pxIn the fall of 1943, the USS Eldridge was allegedly made invisible and teleported from Pennsylvania to Virginia in an incident that came to be known as the Philadelphia Experiment. Of course, the incident never occurred—but that didn’t stop Alfred Bielek from achieving notoriety as Eldridge’s reputed lone survivor. His memories were “buried” until he saw the movie The Philadelphia Experiment in 1988, at which time he “remembered” that he was born in 1916 as Ed Cameron.

As Cameron, he’d been recruited in 1940 for an alleged Navy Project called Project Rainbow, whose purpose was to figure out how to make ships invisible. For reasons not entirely clear, “black ops” soldiers later sent Cameron through a portal at the Pentagon to Alpha Centauri One, where aliens interrogated him and then “physically regressed” him into one-year-old Al Bielek in 1927. Bialek claimed he later became director of mind control for the Montauk Project, whose members in the ‘80s traveled through a time vortex and changed the outcomes of various wars. When they returned to their own time, they would decide if they’d changed things for the better. If not, they would simply restore the status quo.

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Why People Believe Invisible Agents Control the World

A Skeptic’s take on souls, spirits, ghosts, gods, demons, angels, aliens and other invisible powers that be

Michael ShermerBy Michael Shermer via Scientific American

Souls, spirits, ghosts, gods, demons, angels, aliens, intelligent designers, government conspirators, and all manner of invisible agents with power and intention are believed to haunt our world and control our lives. Why?

Our human tendency to find meaningful patterns in meaningless noise causes us to see this face on Mars.

The answer has two parts, starting with the concept of “patternicity,” which I defined in my December 2008 column as the human tendency to find meaningful patterns in meaningless noise. Consider the face on Mars, the Virgin Mary on a grilled cheese sandwich, satanic messages in rock music. Of course, some patterns are real. Finding predictive patterns in changing weather, fruiting trees, migrating prey animals and hungry predators was central to the survival of Paleolithic hominids.

The problem is that we did not evolve a baloney-detection device in our brains to discriminate between true and false patterns. So we make two types of errors: a type I error, or false positive, is believing a pattern is real when it is not; a type II error, or false negative, is not believing a pattern is real when it is. If you believe that the rustle in the grass is a dangerous predator when it is just the wind (a type I error), you are more likely to survive than if you believe that the rustle in the grass is just the wind when it is a dangerous predator (a type II error). Because the cost of making a type I error is less than the cost of making a type II error and because there is no time for careful deliberation between patternicities in the split-second world of predator-prey interactions, natural selection would have favored those animals most likely to assume that all patterns are real.

But we do something other animals do not do. As large-brained hominids with a developed cortex and a theory of mind—the capacity to be aware of such mental states as desires and intentions in both ourselves and others—we infer agency behind the patterns we observe in a practice I call “agent­icity”: coincidences there are no_250pxthe tendency to believe that the world is controlled by invisible intentional agents. We believe that these intentional agents control the world, sometimes invisibly from the top down (as opposed to bottom-up causal randomness). Together patternicity and agent­icity form the cognitive basis of shamanism, paganism, animism, polytheism, monotheism, and all modes of Old and New Age spiritualisms.

Agenticity carries us far beyond the spirit world. The Intelligent Designer is said to be an invisible agent who created life from the top down. Aliens are often portrayed as powerful beings coming down from on high to warn us of our impending self-destruction. Conspiracy theories predictably include hidden agents at work behind the scenes, puppet masters pulling political and economic strings as we dance to the tune of the Bilderbergers, the Roth­schilds, the Rockefellers or the Illuminati. Even the belief that government can impose top-down measures to rescue the economy is a form of agenticity, with President Barack Obama being touted as “the one” with almost messianic powers who will save us.

There is now substantial evidence from cognitive neuroscience that humans readily find patterns and impart agency to them . . .

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Conspiracies: Five things they don’t want you to know

By Jesse Walker via The Boston Globe

Conspiracies 901_250pxIt might seem like we’re living at a uniquely rich moment for conspiracy theories. Over the last few years, we’ve seen it claimed that Osama bin Laden didn’t really die, that Barack Obama is covering up the true circumstances of his birth, that Kanye West and Kim Kardashian have encoded Illuminati symbolism in their baby’s name, that the National Security Agency has been secretly intercepting Americans’ phone calls and e-mails—oh, wait. That last one’s true.

It’s easy to write off conspiracy theories as the delusions of the political fringe, a minor nuisance fueled by the rise of the Internet. Easy—and inaccurate. Conspiracy stories have been a major part of American life since Colonial days. They are not just found in the political extremes, and they are not invariably wrong. And even when they are wrong, as is so often true, they still have lessons to teach us. To understand why conspiracies matter, it helps to clear away some myths that have attached themselves to the subject.

Myth #1: People today are uniquely prone to believing conspiracy theories

youtube graduate_250pxA 2011 article in the British newspaper The Independent flatly declared that “there are more conspiracy theories and more conspiracy theory believers than ever before.” This, the reporter continued, was largely “because the internet has made it easy to propagate rumour and supposition on a global scale.” As an example, he cited a story that the Ku Klux Klan secretly owned KFC and was lacing “the food with a drug that makes only black men impotent.”

But there has never been an age when conspiracy theories were not popular. From Puritan fears that Satan was commanding a conspiracy of Indians to Thomas Jefferson’s concern that the British had “a deliberate and systematical plan of reducing us to slavery,” from the assassination rumors that followed the death of President Zachary Taylor to the tales of subversion told during the Cold War, every significant event in American history has inspired conspiracy theories. And a lot of insignificant events have, too.

Some of those stories showed up in major media outlets, but others we know about only because social scientists took the time to collect them. Thanks to the sociologist Howard Odum, for example, who studied the stories circulating among Southerners in the 1940s, we know that there were people who believed, in one white person’s words, that “Hitler has told the Negroes he will give them the South for their help.” paranoid illuminati_250pxThe chief difference the Internet has made—other than allowing such stories, like any stories, to spread more quickly—is to make them more visible. Rumors that once were limited to a single subculture can spill out into the open. The volume and intensity of conspiracy fears haven’t necessarily increased; they’re just easier for outsiders to hear.

It’s telling that The Independent’s example of an Internet-fueled rumor actually predates the Internet age. The folklorist Patricia Turner first encountered the KFC story in the 1980s, though in the version she heard the villainous restaurant was supposed to be Church’s Chicken. She eventually determined that the rumor had been around since at least the ’70s. You can’t blame the Web for that.

Myth #2: Conspiracy theories always involve villains

It isn’t always scary to imagine a grand design. Sometimes it’s a comfort. People say “Everything happens for a reason” or “It’s all God’s plan” to soothe you, not to frighten you. And it’s just a small step from there to a worldview where the grand design is executed not by God but by a benevolent conspiracy.

Conspiracy folklore is filled with this sort of story, starring everyone from Rosicrucians to extraterrestrials to a hidden order of adepts based beneath Mount Shasta. The California writer Manly P. Hall, for example, believed the United States was being guided to a special destiny by an Order of the Quest, which had intervened in everything from Columbus’s voyage to the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

Myth #3: Conspiracy theories are just a feature of the fringe

paranoia 737_201pxIn the most widely read—or at least widely namechecked—study of political paranoia, “The Paranoid Style in American Politics,” the historian Richard Hofstadter called conspiracism “the preferred style only of minority movements.” Yet the mainstream regularly embraces conspiracy theories, some of which look deeply bizarre in retrospect.

Consider the great Satansim scare. In the 1980s, older tales about Satanic conspiracies collided with three secular fears: a wave of stories about missing children, a heightened concern with child abuse, and worries about religious cults. The result was a period when mainstream reporters and officials embraced the idea that a network of Satanists was kidnapping, molesting, and murdering American children.

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Alex Jones Insists the Kenyan Terrorist Attack Was Orchestrated by President Obama

By via The Huffington Post

Westgate_250pxOver the weekend, members of the al-Qaeda terrorist cell known as Harakat al-Shabaab al-Mujahideen stormed into the Westgate shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya and murdered at least 68 men, women and children in cold blood. The cell, more commonly known as al-Shabaab or the “Youth,” claim to have conducted the attack in retaliation against Kenya for its military presence in neighboring Somalia, while also attempting to provoke a violent response from Kenya against ethnic Somalis.

It’s just the kind of horrifyingly tragic event that’s totally ripe to be trivialized by another Alex Jones “false flag” conspiracy theory. But this time, instead of just off-handedly labeling it a false flag to distract from another previous false flag, Jones, on his Monday broadcast, went into breathless detail about how it all went down with President Obama pulling the strings.

Of course.

Because Obama is Kenyan.

Get it?

alex-jones_200pxLeading up to the discussion about the Westgate terrorist attack, Jones ranted, seemingly at random and incongruously linking each topic sentence-to-sentence, about the following: torture; NSA and CIA spying on him personally; Prince Bandar gave chemical weapons to al-Qaeda rebels in Syria; Dan Bidondi uncovered a massive conspiracy while attending three Navy Yard press conferences; terrorists might try to kill Jones; we need to pray for InfoWars because it’s “dead center in the middle of world events”; Saudis stealing your cameras; the government wants to take our guns; the “out of control” security services in America are “threatening members of the press”; and Ron Paul referring to the Syrian chemical weapons attack as a false flag (he really did). All of this within the span of about 24 minutes. In the midst of this syllabus of madness, Jones said, “We get what’s going on.” The psychosis of the conspiracy theorist: only they know the truth about how the world works.

So it goes with the attack in Nairobi.

AlexJonesMoron_240pxThe centerpiece of his freshly minted al-Shabaab conspiracy theory? The U.S. government runs al-Qaeda. Not maybe. It absolutely does run al-Qaeda. He knows this because it was printed using actual English words on pieces of paper scattered on his radio console. The very fact that his conspiracy theories are printed on paper makes them real, you see, real enough for him to wave them around on his show while rattling off various Texas-twanged, strep-throated word salads featuring every imaginable paranoiac shibboleth.

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Conspiracy Palooza

matrix-red-pill-or-blue-pill_600px
Stephen Propatier4.10.2013 | by Stephen Propatier Via Skeptoid

I always find conspiracy theories to be the most interesting aspect of the information age. The thought process fascinates me. I also love to see how conspiracy thinking breeds conspiracy thinking. There was a national telephone survey questioning 1247 registered US voters on 20 of the “Most Famous” conspiracy theories  The response was, lets say, entertaining.

In no particular order.

ALIENSprotest_350px

  1.  13% President Barack Obama is the “Anti-Christ”
  2. 14% 1980′s Crack Cocaine epidemic was created by the CIA.
  3. 30% believe aliens visit us.
  4. 21% of voters say a UFO crashed in Roswell, NM in 1947 and the US government covered it up.
  5. 28% of voters believe secretive power elite with a globalist agenda is conspiring to eventually rule the world through an authoritarian world government, or New World Order.
  6. Voters are split 44%-45% on whether Bush intentionally misled about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.
  7. 9% of voters think the government adds fluoride to our water supply for sinister reasons (not just dental health)
  8. 4% of voters say they believe “lizard people” control our societies by gaining political power.
  9. 51% of voters say a larger conspiracy was at work in the JFK assassination, just 25% say Oswald acted alone
  10.  14% of voters believe in Bigfoot.
  11. ALEXJONESFOIL_250px 15% of voters say the government or the media adds mind-controlling technology to TV broadcast signals
  12. 5% believe exhaust seen in the sky behind airplanes is actually chemicals sprayed by the government for sinister reasons
  13.  15% of voters think the medical industry and the pharmaceutical industry “invent” new diseases to make money.
  14.  Just 5% of voters believe that Paul McCartney actually died in 1966.
  15. 6% of voters believe Osama bin Laden is still alive.
  16. 28% of voters believe Saddam Hussein was involved in the 9/11 attacks.
  17.  7% of voters think the moon landing was faked
  18.  20% of voters believe there is a link between childhood vaccines and autism.
  19. 37% of voters believe global warming is a hoax.
  20.  11% of voters believe the US government allowed 9/11 to happen.

To be generous this is a small number of people and may not be representative of the US as a whole. MY TAKE ON THE FINDINGS:

  1. President Obama been pretty ineffective as the Anti-Christ, I mean a whole first term and no nuclear holocaust. I guess you also have to believe in Christ to be concerned about the anti-Christ.
  2. Crack epidemic Sure why not? I mean all government agencies love it when their funding is stolen by competing departments…DEA?
  3. Aliens? Possible but I think it is nothing more than human arrogance that makes us believe that we would be interesting to advanced cultures.

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Conspiracy Theorists Claim Obama Secret Service Agent Is an ‘Alien Shape-Shifter’

This is some of the funniest stuff i’ve seen and heard in a long time. The last video at the bottom is the best, the seriousness of the narrator just had me rolling on the floor! Who says this kind of stuff with a straight face?

Grab the popcorn and enjoy! :)

via TheBlaze.com

Shape-Shifter Secret Service Agent

Shape-Shifting Secret Service Agent

Why is a video of President Barack Obama’s speech at the 2012 American Israel Public Affairs Committee conference being aired now, a year later? Well, someone has actually scoured the Internet and found footage claiming it to be evidence that a member of his Secret Service detail is an alien shape-shifter.

No, we’re not making this up.

Several blogs have been reporting about the video over the last few days. It appears that the hoopla over it might have started because of a segment from Obama’s speech was re-aired in February by Jewish News One. It was in this footage that the agent in question appears to have been spotted.

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

(Image: YouTube screenshot)

Here’s the footage (Note: the agent appears in the crowd at 0:37):

Here’s footage from the speech showing the Secret Service agent from another angle:

Since discussion about these videos began percolating this year, compilation videos of the speech have been cropping up on YouTube as well.

[…]

Check out this video complete with a voice-over that speculates perhaps his “shape-shifting device failed during Obama’s speech” or that he could be an Illuminati member or a reptilian humanoid:

One blogger, who noted that they first found out about this information from this extraterrestrials forum, pointed out that not all “reptoidsshould be considered evil. The blogger continued that because Obama is the “one chosen to lead us through the dark and into the Light of Ascension” and due to the death threats made against him and his family, “it’s probable that he has a bodyguard who is not human.”

How serious are these claims?

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SANDY HOOK TROOF?!

This video is a bit lengthy (about 18 minutes) but it’s a very good debunking of the vile Sandy Hook conspiracy theories. Definitely worth viewing. Be forewarned though, there is a bit of salty language throughout the video – not a lot, but enough that i felt a warning was warranted.  :)

HT: Thomas J. Proffit

Video description via YouTube:

The Sandy Hook Shooting was a tragedy, but America’s growing conspiracy theorist movement has turned it into a farce.

The video I’m responding to:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wx9GxXYKx_8&feature=youtu.be

Special thanks to the invaluable research of the reddit user, Preggit.
http://www.reddit.com/r/skeptic/comments/16lkhq/this_sandy_hook_conspiracy_vi…

10 Lies Truthers Tell

via The Soap Box

The 9/11 conspiracy theories are probably some of the most thoroughly debunked conspiracy theories out there, with thousands of people devoting hundreds of hours to debunk these theories. Some of these theories have been debunked for so long, and so early on, and have such clear evidence (including photographic evidence) that they can only be best described as lies.

Here is what could be considered 10 of the biggest lies people in the 9/11 Truth movement (or Truthers, as they are commonly called) tell:

(Author’s note: these are just the 10 I remembered off of my head. There are actually a lot more than this.)

• 10. There were pools and rivers of molten steel at the WTC site.

No there wasn’t. There are satellite pictures of hot spots where the towers stood, and pictures of steel beams that were red hot, but never any pictures of molten steel, nor has anyone who was actually at the site after the towers fell have ever claimed to have seen pools and rivers of molten steel.

CruiseMissile_250px

NOTE: The image above is a fake.
Click the image for more information.

The satellite pictures that show these hot spots show that those areas were actually places where underground fires were, and not molten steel because the temperature of the heat being given off from those areas was not hot enough to cause steel to melt.

• 9. No plane was witnessed hitting the Pentagon.

Actually there are multiple witnesses to the plane hitting the Pentagon. There is also video taken from a security camera that, while it is very difficult to tell for many people, does show a plane hitting the Pentagon.

• 8. No pieces of American Airlines Flight 77 was ever found at the Penatgon.

Actually much of the plane was recovered, including remains of the passengers on board (including the five hijackers), and the flight recorder (although damaged to the point where nothing usable could be recovered on it). In fact there are actually photos of pieces of the planes that were being recovered from the crash site and removed from the site for further investigation.

• 7. The towers fell at free fall speeds.

Click the image to watch
9/11: Were Explosives Used?

No they didn’t. The towers fell at speeds slower then free fall. There are videos that show the towers falling at free fall speeds, but these videos have had their speed altered to make it look like they are falling at free fall speeds.

• 6. The towers imploded.

No they didn’t. If you were to watch any videos of the towers collapsing then you would see that the towers collapsed on top of themselves rather then implode into themselves, the results of which spewed out a lot of debris over the site, heavily damaging many of the other buildings there.

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Meet the Sandy Hook truthers

Theorists think they’ve found “absolute proof”
Newtown was a hoax. Have they no shame?

By via Salon.com

IN19_CONNECTICUT_S_1299946g

Yes, there really are Newtown truthers.

But in the crazy world of Sandy Hook conspiracy theories, this one may be the worst yet. (Maybe you’ve already heard some of the others, like the one about fantasy ties between the gunman’s family and the LIBOR banking scandal and a related theory about the Aurora shooting and the “Dark Knight Rises.”) Most of the theories are really pieces of a larger meta-theory: that the Sandy Hook shooting was a hoax, perhaps by the Obama administration, designed to stir demand for gun control.

In the latest angle, theorists think they have found “absolute proof” of a conspiracy to defraud the American people. “You reported in December that this little girl had been killed,” a reader emailed Salon in response to a story. “She has been found, and photographed with President Obama.”

The girl in question is Emilie Parker, a 6-year-old who was shot multiple times and killed at Sandy Hook. But for conspiracy theorists, the tears her family shed at her funeral, the moving eulogy from Utah’s governor, and the entire shooting spree are fake. Welcome to the world where Sandy Hook didn’t really happen.

Alex Jones is a virtual one-stop shop for Sandy Hook “false flag” miscellanea.

Alex Jones is a virtual one-stop shop for
Sandy Hook “false flag” miscellanea.

There are dozens of websites, blog posts and YouTube videos extolling the Emilie Parker hoax theory. If you Google her name, the very first result is a post mocking her father for crying at a press conference after the shooting. One popular video, which already has 134,000 views, was made by the producers of a popular 9/11 Truther film. “Just as the movie ‘Operation Terror’ shows the 9/11 attacks were a made-for-TV event, so too were the mass shootings … There can be no doubt that Sandy Hook was a staged event,” the narrator intones. He goes on to say that the adults who participated in the media coverage of the shootings “should be prosecuted as accessories after the fact in a mass murder” — i.e., the parents whose children were murdered in the massacre should be thrown in prison.

The crux of the theory is a photograph of Parker’s sister sitting on President Obama’s lap when he visited with the victims’ families. The girl is wearing the same dress Emilie wore in a pre-shooting photograph of the family shared with media, so she must be Emilie, alive and well. “BAM! I cannot believe how idiot these people are [sic]… That’s her,” one YouTuber exclaims as he watches the two images superimposed on each other. (Apparently missed by these crack investigators is the possibility that the sister wore Emilie’s dress and that they look alike because they are sisters, after all.)

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2012 Failed and Forgotten Psychic Predictions

via Relatively Interesting

psychic_250pxAnother year has come and gone, and with it, a slew of failed and forgotten psychic predictions.  Each year, the world’s “leading” psychics lay down their predictions in January, and then we review them one year later to see how they did.  Before reviewing their track record for 2012, let’s consider a handful of significant news items that were not predicted.

What the Psychics Didn’t Predict for 2012

Here’s what the leading psychics failed to predict in 2012:

  • New York and New Jersey being hit with Hurricane Sandy.  Some warning to the victims would have been greatly appreciated.
  • Century 16 movie theatre shooting where 12 people were killed and dozens injured
  • One of the worst school shootings in American history which left 26 dead in Newtown, Connecticut.
  • The crisis in Syria reaching new heights
  • Discovery of the Higg’s Boson
  • Cruise ship “Costa Concordia” running aground in Italy, killing 15.
  • The death of Whitney Houston (despite the fact that Psychic Nikki listed 121 celebrities that need to “watch out” or may die in 2012)
  • CIA Director David Patraeus’ affair and subsequent resignation

To see a comprehensive list of major news stories that occurred in 2012, visit HitoryOrb’s website.  There are many more that qualify as significant, and an equal number that were not predicted.  It’s only fair that psychics are judged not only on what they predicted, but what they failed to predict.

And now, let’s see how some of the world’s leading psychics, seers, and mentalists fared.

Year 2012 Psychic Predictions and Their Results

The psychic predictions below were compiled from the paranormal section on About.com, along with each Psychic’s individual websites.  The authors have made their best efforts to research the results, and their comments are in italics and red.  Feel free to add your own comments at the bottom of this article..

Judy Hevenly

crystal ball FAILURE_300PXJudy Hevenly is a teacher, astrologer, and writer, whose forecasts have appeared in many publications and newspapers worldwide. Her clientele includes royalty, former presidents, Hollywood movie stars, and heads of state. Judy was also called in to work at the O.J. Simpson trial. She is featured in the book, The 100 Top Psychics in America.

  • Unemployment in U.S. to fall to about 9.5 percent. Jobs in demand will be healthcare, science, technology, senior caretakers and jobs overseas.  It’s actually at 7.7% at the time this article was written.
  • An Emmy Award for Anderson Cooper TV talk show.  He did not win an Emmy.
  • A baby boy for Kate Middleton and Prince William.  Now, Kate is indeed pregnant in 2012, but the sex of the baby is still unknown to the public.  Either way, this prediction has a 50% of being correct, and those odds ain’t bad.
  • A tsunami in Hawaii; major wildfires in Canada.  There was a small tsunami in Hawaii after a strong earthquake of the coast of British Columbia, Canada.  As for the wildfires – there are always wildfires, and so “major wildfires” is ill defined.
  • Gold bar, $2,000 an ounce; oil, $130 a barrel.  Gold hovered around $1,800, but never hit $2,000.  Oil did not hit $130, not even for a single day.
  • World population hits 7.6 billion in 2012. Do the math and you can figure the number out – this shouldn’t count as a prediction.
  • Iran to become Persian Gulf major refinery.  I thought they already were, at least since 2008 and at least since 2010 according to this article (see graph indicating gas and oil production).
  • Barack Obama re-elected president.  50/50 chance on this one, and she got it.
  • Russia to become a member of the World Trade OrganizationThis happened in August 2012.
  • Facial recognition software will add a new level of security to U.S. computers.  Whose computers?  Households?  Military?  Government?  This isn’t clear in the prediction.
  • Breakthrough in the cure of Lyme disease.  This is highly subjective.  What constitutes a breakthrough?  By who?  Can any quack claim it for this prediction to be right?  Journalists will often use the term “breakthrough” to showcase positive results.
  • Power outages in Paris, Las Vegas, London, New York, and Los Angeles.  Now, technically she got New York right due to Hurricane Sandy, but she did use the term “and” between all those cities, meaning they should have all been affected…
  • Throwback to the 1960s with longer skirts for women in the fashion world.  Men will also wear shoes with black soles…
  • Angels will actually be seen walking among us by some with extraordinary powers of perception.  Absolutely did not happen, since there’s still no scientifically valid evidence to suggest that angels exist.

Psychic Nikki

crystal_ball_01In 2011, Nikki — “Psychic to the Stars” — says she predicted the Japan earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the Wall Street protests in New York City, the devastating Joplin, Missouri tornadoes, the deaths of Elizabeth Taylor and Amy Winehouse, and the trouble in Syria. Here’s what she sees for 2012 (note, this is only part of the list):

  • Earthquake in Mexico City destroying most of the city.  Did not happen.
  • Major breakthrough in the cure for breast cancer.  Again, define “breakthrough”.  In our research, nothing really qualified (using “revolutionary or epic” as a baseline).
  • Giant earthquake in California.  Did not happen.
  • Animals and birds, wild and domestic, will attack people leading up to the end of 2012.  This is a ridiculous prediction.  No comment.
  • Weird weather conditions worldwide including snow in Hawaii, Las Vegas and in the Caribbean.  As far as I know, there was no snowfall in these locations, although Las Vegas would be the most likely candidate.
  • Major earthquakes in Washington, Oregon, British Columbia and Alaska.  Sneaky – pick a few major state/provinces along the Pacific Ring of Fire where earthquakes are common, and you’re bound to get one.  And she did – British Columbia.
  • Giant prehistoric Sea Monsters under the sea.  Swing and a miss.

LOTS MORE . . .

Alex “Einstein” Jones’ Torturous Genius Level Understanding

Ladies and gentlemen, once again i present to you … my favorite moron …   … Alex Jones!

Alex “Einstein” Jones’ Torturous Genius Level Understanding.

Agenda 21 mind control conspiracy idea circulating among Republicans

Top Georgia GOP Lawmakers Host Briefing on Secret Obama Mind-Control Plot

via Mother Jones

President Obama is using a Cold War-era mind-control technique known as “Delphi” to coerce Americans into accepting his plan for a United Nations-run communist dictatorship in which suburbanites will be forcibly relocated to cities. That’s according to a four-hour briefing delivered to Republican state senators at the Georgia state Capitol last month.

On October 11, at a closed-door meeting of the Republican caucus convened by the body’s majority leader, Chip Rogers, a tea party activist told Republican lawmakers that Obama was mounting this most diabolical conspiracy. The event—captured on tape by a member of the Athens-based watchdog Better Georgia (who was removed from the room after 52 minutes)—had been billed as an information session on Agenda 21, a nonbinding UN agreement that commits member nations to promote sustainable development. In the eyes of conservative activists, Agenda 21 is a nefarious plot that includes forcibly relocating non-urban-dwellers and prescribing mandatory contraception as a means of curbing population growth. The invitation to the Georgia state Senate event noted the presentation would explain: “How pleasant sounding names are fostering a Socialist plan to change the way we live, eat, learn, and communicate to ‘save the earth.'”

MORE . . .

FEMA camps: American Holocaust

Embarrassing Conspiracy Theory Follow up

via The Soap Box

Note: Special thanks to Autistic Skeptic for sending me some information on this and then putting this into movie form.

In a previous Embarrassing Conspiracy Theory article I talked about how many conspiracy theorists believe that the government is going to declare martial law and place dissenters into large prison camps run by FEMA, often times called FEMA camps. These conspiracy theorist also believe that the government is stock-piling plastic burial vaults in order to place large amounts of bodies in what is suppose to be the mass killing of millions of citizens via biological weapons, or some other more violent means.

There are multiple photos floating around the internet showing thousands of these plastic burial vaults in highly visible, outdoor storage facilities. Some of these vaults are along major roads and highways, and are very easy to find and access. Many of these facilities don’t even have fences around them, and would allow anyone who wanted to, to go up to one of these places and have a look around.

It seems a tad bit odd the government would have them out in the open like this if they were going to be used in a massive conspiracy to kill millions. This leads to the question that if this was part of some huge conspiracy to kill off millions of people, then why would they be out in the open like they are?

Also, if the government was planning to murder millions, then why would they bother to put the bodies in plastic burial vaults in the first place, when it would be easier and cheaper to bury the bodies without a burial vault?

The only purpose for burial vaults is to protect the casket and the body inside from the dirt outside of it, which would also explain why these vaults are so large and look like they could hold three or four people. So it makes no sense that the government is willing to protect the bodies of millions of people that it’s going to allegedly murder.

MORE . . .

Washington Attorney: ‘I have physically traveled in time’

By Matt Markovich via KATU.com – Portland, Oregon

VANCOUVER, Wash. – The new Bruce Willis movie “Looper” opened this weekend, in which Willis’ character is sent back in time to kill himself.

And while most scientists say time travel isn’t possible, a Washington attorney claims he’s done it dozens of times as part of a secret Cold War project.

“I have physically traveled in time,” says Andrew Basiago, an attorney in Vancouver, Wash. “We have – we did over 40 years ago.”

Now Basiago is on a mission – to reveal what he calls a 40-year government cover-up – of Project Pegasus – where he says he was teleported back and sideways in time, dozens of times.

“I have the whole story, I have hundreds of facts,” he says. “I can tell you what personnel were at what locations where and which travel device was being used.”

And his time travel wasn’t recent – it’s when he was a kid.

“I entered the program officially in the fall of 1969 as a third grader, age 7,” says Basiago.

He says he was one of 140 kids, 60 adults – chrononauts, including his dad, who he says joined him on his first jump.

“My dad held my hand, we jumped through the field of energy, and we seem to be moving very rapidly but there was also a paradox and we seemed to be going no where at all,” he says.

The TV show “Fringe” aired a similar scene two years ago. A coincidence?

Paradoxes, unscientific claims, unbelievable stories and encounters on Earth and Mars – including meeting Barack Obama when the president was a kid.

Basiago also says he time-traveled six times to the Ford Theatre on the day President Lincoln was shot – but he didn’t see it happen. He also saw President Lincoln on another famous occasion, he says.

“In fact, during one probe, the one to Gettysburg, the Gettysburg Address, I was dressed as Union bugle boy,” he says.

That’s right – he was at the Gettysburg Address. He says a famous photo taken that day proves it. The picture shows a bugle boy who he says is him. It’s the only visual evidence he provides for any of his travels – nothing else.

“I was physically at Gettysburg,” says Basiago.

He says his time travel experiences show that teleportation as protrayed on the “Star Trek” series is all wrong.

“No, in fact if you had just arrived via quantum teleportation, the Star Trek method of teleportation, you would have collapsed as a dead person,” he says.

Basiago weaves his tale with such conviction, he’s either a psychopathic liar, a lunatic – or the fastest-thinking science fiction writer on Earth.

“A tunnel was opening up in time-space just like a soap bubble being blown by a child,” he says. “And when that bubble closed, we were repositioned elsewhere in time-space on the face of the Earth.”

Some would say Basiago is still living in a bubble, but he’s put his professional reputation at risk claiming time travel isn’t science fiction – because he did it.

It was hard for KOMO News to confirm any of Basiago’s claims. Still, he says many out there say they believe Project Pegasus was real.

Conspiracy Thinking

via NeuroLogica Blog

I remain fascinated with the mindset of the conspiracy theorist. Partly this is because I think we all have a little conspiracy theorist inside us – deep within our evolved psyche. There is something very compelling and satisfying about believing that you have peeked behind the curtain and seen the true machinations at work in the world. Hardcore conspiracy theorists are mostly regular people who have fallen into a psychological trap, or perhaps they simply have a greater tendency towards the kinds of thinking that leads to belief in conspiracies. Theirs, however, is a difference in magnitude, not kind.

I recently received an e-mail with an innocent question from someone who appears to fall into the former group – a regular guy whose conspiracy sense has been tickled. The e-mailer’s brother, who is a conspiracy theorist by his account, pointed him to this Youtube video – a short clip from an interview with John McCain and Barack Obama during the 2008 election. Take a look at the interview before reading further.

McCain is apparently posturing about the debate schedule between him and Obama (typical political fare for a US election), and refers back to the debate planning between Barry Goldwater and JFK before the “Intervention and the tragedy at Dallas.”  The video would probably pass most people by without a thought, or perhaps just the slightest notice of the word choice by McCain. Calling the assassination of JFK an “intervention” at first seems like an odd word choice. Did he say “the intervention and the tragedy at Dallas,” or “the intervention of the tragedy at Dallas,” – meaning that the tragedy intervened in the course of events? It’s probably the latter. It’s also possible that the wrong word came out, or the intended word did not come to mind (although there does not appear to be any delay or stuttering). Either way, this is a non-event.

Yet conspiracy theorists have taken this one odd word and made it into evidence for a JFK assassination conspiracy. Disclose.tv, for example, describes the moment this way: …

Keep Reading: NeuroLogica Blog » Conspiracy Thinking.

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