Tag Archives: optical illusion

Debunked: Floating City Above China | Metabunk

Have you seen the YouTube video of the impossibly large city floating above the fog in the city of Foshan, Guangdong province, China?

Floating City China

As with most phenomenon there is a very logical explanation and the good people over at MetaBunk.org have the explanation.

Click on over to Metabunk to find out how this illusion was achieved! :)

Mason I. Bilderberg

The Escherian Stairwell

Originally posted May 25, 2013:

Does the Escherian stairwell really exist?

Source: The Escherian Stairwell (Original video) (YouTube)

Also see:

How The Ames Room Illusion Works

Did somebody say optical illusion? This is a classic illusion explained. :)

By Scientific American via YouTube

In 1934, ophthalmologist Adelbert Ames, Jr. devised a room that pushes the boundaries of human perception. Visit a virtual version of the now famous Ames room, as Scientific American Mind editor Ingrid Wickelgren explains how it works.

Brain Game: Motion-induced blindness

If you know me you know i like a good illusion. Exposing flaws in the brain is fun!

Here is a good one from Mighty Optical Illusions

Keep staring at the flashing green dot, and the yellow dots will fade or disappear due to motion-induced blindness.

motion-induced blindness

Related:

The Magical Match

This is a pretty cool trick from Richard Wiseman via YouTube

Moving Illusions

As many of you know, i LOVE optical illusions. Not just because of their visual impact, but also because of the insights it can give us into the workings of our brain, another favorite topic of mine.

This is one of my favorite YouTube channels because they always post something interesting.

Check it out. :)

MIB


Via ▶ Moving Illusions – YouTube

Animated Dots Illusion

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

Are you ready for an optical illusion that’s somewhat of a brain teaser, but it also going to mess with your sense of perception a little bit? This animated optical illusion is definitely going to mess with your mind, because it’s cool to look at as just an animated image with a nice effect or you may get something more out of it. To me, this animation is a bit creepy, because it reminds me of a scene from the film “House on Haunted Hill,” but you may not find it creepy at all. Either way, the object of this illusion is to look at it and see if any words appear to you. Scroll down below to check out the illusion:

Animated-Dots

Now, as you see, this is a really cool illusion. There are dots moving and it looks as if they’re on some sort of a conveyor belt or what not. However, some people say that the dots actually make up words in this image. Do you see any words appearing in the image? If so, you should leave a comment below and let us know. If not, I’m sure you’ll enjoy looking at the image for the cool effect it gives off. If you like this optical illusion, you should rate it and let us know. Alternatively, you could leave a comment.

The Shining Optical Illusion

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

I just found an optical illusion that actually threw me off a little bit. I stared  at this image, wondering what the optical illusion was and I came close to closing out of it and dragging it to the recycle bin, but I decided to post it. I was a bit shocked when I realized what happened. Stop reading this text right now, scroll down and patiently watch this optical illusion and you’ll see exactly what I’m talking about. No cheating, go look right now!

The-Shining-Optical-Illusion

Now, this is a pretty cool picture and it’s taken from a movie that I really enjoy: The Shining. You see, I’m a pretty big fan of horror movies and this is definitely a creepy movie. If you’re a fan of horror movies, you’ll know that this is a classic one. Even though I liked this image, I didn’t know if it would work well on the site, but then I remembered that this is actually an optical illusion. You see, these are called cinemagraph optical illusions. If you like this image, you should use it on a message board or anywhere you’re active online. It will definitely catch people off-guard and they will love it.
[END]

Tetrahedron Optical Illusion

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

Many people have a hard time grasping what the meaning behind an optical illusion really is. I am no exception to the rule although I try my best to decipher the true meaning behind these works of art! Depending on the illusion, I can sit there for what seems like forever and never really get to the bottom of it. This Tetrahedron wasn’t any different for me. After looking at it for a little while, I still couldn’t quite grasp what the whole point of it was. It only appeared to be a spinning triangle that boasted a variety of colors in the image itself.
Tetrahedron
You tell me. What did you get out of this animated gif? Am I totally missing something in this simplistic piece of art? Did you notice how the color changes as the Tetrahedron spins around? The way the light reflects through the image is pretty cool and not something I would have ever thought of on my own. In reality, this thing is so simple that it shouldn’t be as intriguing as it is. Yet, I find myself sitting here and staring at the thing as it rotates round and round changing color along the way.

From green to brown to green to brown, the color changing technology in this Tetrahedron is something that you have to watch and observe to gain a full understanding of the illusion. Even though it looks like a triangle to me, that doesn’t mean you are going to think the same thing. Everyone has their own opinion on what optical illusions are cool and which ones they find boring or uninteresting.  Take the time to explore this rotating shape and see what you get out of it. Maybe you will see something that I didn’t, but for me, it really was something simple and amazing all at the same time.


[END]

▶ Honda Illusions, An Impossible Made Possible

If you know me, you’ll know why i love this video – i love optical illusions. Check it out.

MIB


Via HondaVideo – YouTube.


Here is how they created these effects:

When The Lights Were Out

From the good folks over at Mighty Optical Illusions. They always have fun and interesting stuff.

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

As it always goes with Rob Gonsalves, transitions he makes can be tricky to “digest” at first. Once again I invite you all to try and spot the logical “tipping” point, a postion where one motif ends and another one begins. Rob’s transformations are unique at very least. For more similar stuff be sure to check this tag.

When-The-Lights-Were-Out-by-Rob-Gonsalves

Circling Dots Optical Illusion

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

Here’s an excellent “wavy” animation discovered by Till Hartmann. It’s a great illustration of a collective phenomena. When you observe closely, each dot travels along a regular circle-path. Since most of the circles are mutually out of phase, they form illusive waves floating steadily across the screen. Things like this happen all over the place; just take water or sound waves for example. They work in basically the same way – the small back-and-forth motions of individual molecules lead to compression larger-scale patterns moving throughout the medium.

It’s a simple demonstration of how large-scale, collective phenomena can emerge from very simple small-scale behaviour.

dots illusion

[end]

via Mighty Optical Illusions

Tetris Optical Illusion

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

Can you make sense of those strange tetris-like symbols filling the screen? They hide more than meets the eye. Those of you staying updated via “Optical Illusion of The Day” widgets, have a slight advantage in solving the “mystery”. After you’re finished with this one, make sure you haven’t missed this, this, this, this and this!

BetThisIllusion

Which Way Is This Train Going?

By Vurdlak via Mighty Optical Illusions

In which direction does this #train move? From which end of the tunnel is it arriving from? It might be both! Check if you can “see” a different direction each time you look at it? If you stare long enough, you might even make the train change its course. Today’s illusion works in the same manner, our famous Spinning Girl does. After all, there is no definitive answer, since the animation loops through just a few frames. On the other hand, if you recognise the station, you just might know the true answer after all ;)

train

Jedi Mind Trick?

Brain Thinks It Inhabits Virtual Body

By Tanya Lewis via LiveScience

In virtual reality, a virtual arm can feel like a real one.
CREDIT: © Mel Slater

The brain’s perception of the body may seem set in stone, but a new study shows the mind can be tricked into taking an entire virtual body for its own.

In 1998, neuroscientists Matthew Botvinick and Jonathan Cohen performed an experiment where they showed people a rubber hand being stroked with a paintbrush, while applying the same strokes to each person’s own, hidden hand. This gave people the feeling that the dummy hand was their own.

Scientists have since demonstrated the so-called rubber hand illusion for other body parts — and even whole bodies. Often this is done by putting people in virtual reality settings.

“It seems the brain, under certain conditions, quite easily accepts the idea that [a virtual body] is your body,” said study author Mel Slater, a computer scientist at the University of Barcelona. [Eye Tricks: Gallery of Visual Illusions]

In the new study, Slater and his colleagues investigated whether taking ownership of a full virtual body resulted in neglect of the real body.

Out-of-body experience

Head-mounted display

Head-mounted display

Study participants wore head-mounted displays in which they saw a virtual body when they looked down at their real body. Half of the participants experienced a realistic body illusion, where the virtual body’s posture and movements matched those of their real body, while the other half experienced an unrealistic one, where the posture and movements didn’t match their own.

The researchers had the participants place their hand on a cooling device, and measured participants’ sensitivity to small changes in temperature as they experienced a realistic virtual body illusion or an unrealistic one.

During the rubber hand illusion, the real hand has been shown to cool down, suggesting the brain pays more attention to the rubber hand. The researchers suspected that if people were neglecting their real body in favor of the virtual one, sensitivity to temperature changes on their real hand would diminish.

But the opposite was true: People remained sensitive to temperature changes when they experienced a strong illusion that the virtual body belonged to them, and became less sensitive when the illusion was unrealistic. In other words, the better the illusion, the more aware people were of temperature changes in their real hand.

MORE . . .

The Escherian Stairwell

Does the Escherian stairwell really exist?

Source: The Escherian Stairwell (Original video) (YouTube)

Also see:

Jastrow Illusion in Action

By Vurdlak via Mighty Optical Illusions

VIDEO: Jastrow Illusion in ActionTake a look at this short and simple animated gif showcasing the Jastrow illusion in action! The Jastrow illusion was first discovered in 1889, by American psychologist Joseph Jastrow. In this clip, both figures are identical in size, although the lower one appears to be slightly longer. The short edge of the upper shape is compared to the long side of the lower one. If you still can’t pinpoint what causes this illusion – it’s because the lower object is placed slightly to the right. This isn’t immediately noticed, because both of their edges are skewed, and both are placed along the imaginary line, one parallel to their edges. I’m not sure I managed to explain this properly, so better take a look at this picture below and you’ll understand the cause immediately!

Jastrow_illusion_revealed

VIDEO: Missing Cubes Optical Illusion

If you know me, you know i love a good optical illusion. Check this out :)

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

missing_cubes_optical_illusion_thumbIf you haven’t had the chance to see this “Missing/Extra Cube” video that went viral recently, here’s your chance to see it now! Norberto Jansenson has re-thinked famous missing-piece illusion (original version included triangle), and then presented it in much more appealing and effective manner.

The idea behind this toy is somewhat identical to “Preposterous Puzzle” and “Confuzzle“. Norberto starts with a wooden frame filled entirely by 63 cubical pieces, where he then starts rearranging them. By the end of the video he ends up with few extra pieces on his side. Let’s see if we can solve this illusive puzzle one more time!

The vanishing train video illusion

If you know me, you know i like anything that messes with our brain. This one is pretty good. If you think you know how it’s done leave a comment. :)

via DECEPTOLOGY

 It might not be quite as impressive as the "Back to the Future" train, but no CGI was involved.

It might not be quite as impressive as the
“Back to the Future” train, but no CGI was involved.

This trick train video is from neuroscientist Al Seckel, who says that it’s of an actual model train going into a tunnel, without the benefit of any computer tricks. So what’s really happening in this optical illusion?

Optical illusion hallucination

This video has been carefully designed to create a strong, natural hallucination.

Use full screen for better results!!

via Eye – Optical illusion – YouTube.

The Hidden Chairs

By via Mighty Optical Illusions

These chairs are something you do not get to see every day. Collection titled “The Hidden Chairs” by French design studio Ibride provides this beautiful, intriguing animated optical illusion you see on your right. It blew my mind first time I saw it! All of the chairs from mentioned collection look irregular and warped, but when you see them from a specific angle, their shape will remind you of the classic design.

When you see each of the chairs from a specific angle, you might easily mistake the right way to sit on them. Gallery below depicts this perfectly! The Hidden Chairs line includes three beech plywood chairs that follow three historical designs: “The Hidden Shaker”, “The Hidden Terence” and finally “The Hidden Wagner”.

Paris-based design trio Ibride comprises graphic designer Rachel Convers, designer Benoît Convers and editor Carine Jannin. The furniture was shown at Maison&Objet design fair in Paris, which finished last week. Let’s see if they manage to trick you as well!

MORE . . .

Check Out 10 Funny Optical Illusions

via Odd Stuff Magazine

Another post dedicated to optical illusions, many of us interested in this topic. Optical illusions created our mind, which is like the easiest way to look at things. At first glance, we are try to correlate the images with the most basic and intimate interpretation, and only in few seconds, we understand what is in the picture, and we begin to see the individual parts.

Change of perspective – is another common technique: it manipulates our visual perception, making the object larger, smaller, closer or farther away than it actually is. In short, Lets look…

(click any image to begin viewing)

Want to see more? Just can’t get enough? Check Out 30 MORE funny optical illusions at Odd Stuff Magazine!

Amazing Illusions

I love illusions! :)

10 Amazing Illusions – YouTube.

Headache-Inducing Spiral Illusion Explained

Four Circles Illusion

By Natalie Wolchover via LifesLittleMysteries.com

Warning: This optical illusion might give you a headache. At a glance, the swirls of tilted black-and-white squares create the perception of a spiral. Look more closely and you realize that the squares don’t form a coil at all; they trace out four perfectly round, concentric circles. The cognitive dissonance between your overall impression of spiraling and your recognition of individual circles … well, it hurts.

This “intertwining illusion” sends the brain conflicting cues.
CREDIT: Pinna & Gregory, 2002

The illusion — called the “intertwining illusion” — has been a hit on social media recently, and it also happens to be the subject of study by researchers around the world. Because optical illusions harness the shift between what the eyes see and what the brain perceives, teasing out how that shift happens enables scientists to understand the inner workings of the human visual system.

When confronted with an optical illusion, or any other scene, “the visual system is interested in inferring what regions of an image are part of the same object or were made by the same process,” explained Alvin Raj, a researcher in the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who uses spiral illusions to study peripheral vision mechanisms.

But in this case, the visual system receives conflicting cues: Some say “circle,” and some say “spiral.” At the periphery of your vision, the spiral cues win.

MORE . . .

The Spinning Dancer Illusion (Updated 2/3/13)

via Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Which way is she spinning?
If the foot touching the ground is perceived to be the left foot, the dancer appears to be spinning clockwise (if seen from above); if it is taken to be the right foot, then she appears to be spinning counterclockwise.

The Spinning Dancer, also known as the silhouette illusion, is a kinetic, bistable optical illusion resembling a pirouetting female dancer. The illusion, created in 2003 by web designer Nobuyuki Kayahara,[1][2] involves the apparent direction of motion of the figure. Some observers initially see the figure as spinning clockwise (viewed from above) and some counterclockwise.

The illusion derives from the lack of visual cues for depth. For instance, as the dancer’s arms move from viewer’s left to right, it is possible to view her arms passing between her body and the viewer (that is, in the foreground of the picture, in which case she would be circling counter-clockwise on her right foot) and it is also possible to view her arms as passing behind the dancer’s body (that is, in the background of the picture, in which case she is seen circling clockwise on her left foot).

When she is facing to the left or to the right, her breasts and ponytail clearly define the direction she is facing, although there is ambiguity in which leg is which. However, as she moves away from facing to the left (or from facing to the right), the dancer can be seen (by different viewers, not by a single individual) facing in either of two directions. At first, these two directions are fairly close to each other (both left, say, but one facing slightly forward, the other facing slightly backward) but they become further and further away from each other until we reach a position where her ponytail and breasts are in line with the viewer (so that neither her breasts nor her ponytail are seen so readily). In this position, she could be facing either away from the viewer or towards the viewer, so that the two positions two different viewers could see are 180 degrees apart.

MORE . . .

Update (2/3/13): The Spinning Dancer Illusion Explained

The miracle of the ball and the glass

I love all things related to slight of hand, magic, mentalism or optical illusions. Can you figure out how this was done? I have my own theory, leave your ideas in the comments section. :)

The miracle of the ball and the glass – YouTube.

illusion: Impossible roof defies gravity

Post by Sandrine Ceurstemont, editor, New Scientist TV

Impossible objects, like those drawn by artist M. C. Escher, don’t seem like they could exist in the real world. But Kokichi Sugihara from Meiji University in Kawasaki, Japan, is well known for building 3D versions of these structures.

Now a new video shows his latest construction: a gravity-defying roof that seems to attract and balance balls on its edge. When the house is rotated, its true form is revealed.

More: New Scientist TV: Impossible roof defies gravity.

Illusions!

I love illusions. I think you’ll really love these. These are not the usual, run-of-the-mill illusions. Watch, you’ll see what i mean. Very creative stuff that must’ve taken him a very long time to setup. Enjoy! :)





via brusspup – YouTube

Mind your step (optical illusion)

Mind your step is a street illusion in Stockholm at Sergels torg created by Erik Johansson.

Mind your step – day 1 – YouTube
For more info http://www.alltelleringet.com/generation7

Shocking illusion – Pretty celebrities turn ugly!

Just weird! Try this …

Shocking illusion – Pretty celebrities turn ugly! – YouTube.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 801 other followers

%d bloggers like this: