Tag Archives: super-bowl

Super Bowl XLVIII Was the Super Bowl of Conspiracy Theories

lead_large_600px
By Abby Ohlheiser via The Wire

Is Bruno Mars a secret member of the Illuminati? Let’s look at the evidence.

In the “yes, he is” column, we have the fact that Mr. Mars headlined the 2014 Super Bowl Halftime show, which as everyone knows is a showcase for Illuminati members and their teachings, i.e. most of the celebrities. That’s convincing enough, so we’re not even going to bother to look at the arguments against the obvious conclusion that Mars’s performance was full of proof.

The performance, as Mark Dice explained on Infowars, was “one big sex magic promotion.” Sex magic (or “magik”), of course, refers to the Illuminati practice of harnessing the magic(k!) of sexual arousal to ascend to a different plane of reality, where you can then alter how you experience the world. And Mars was full of Magic(k) last night. Double goes for the Red Hot Chili Peppers, who released an entire album called Blood Sugar Sex Magik. Plus, former Chili Pepper Dave Navarro also has a bunch of suspicious tattoos, which proves that he’s at least a Freemason. (The two groups are distinct, but basically serve as the basis for the same conspiracy theories at this point, including ideas about lizard-like humanoids running our government. Maybe that’s why he left the band.)

MORE – – –

Was The Super Bowl Rigged?

Conspiracy Theorists Cite Onion-Like Article As Proof 2014 Game Was Fixed

By via International Business Times

Super_Bowl_250pxSunday night’s lopsided 43-8 result in Super Bowl XLVIII between the victorious Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos has brought out conspiracy theorists who believe the game is rigged.

Others who may not have believed that Super Bowl XLVIII was fixed or rigged may have had their minds changed by Huzlers, a website with an Onion-like penchant for satire. Huzlers recently posted a “breaking” story with the headline “Super Bowl XLVIII Believed to Have Been Rigged and Currently Under Investigation by NFL.”

The story claimed NFL officials “just found clues that might prove the game was rigged. Officials believe the Broncos intentionally lost the championship in exchange for a large amount of money.” The fake report goes on to say that Super Bowl referee Terry McAulay overheard Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning asking Seahawks coach Pete Carroll, “When are you going to pay up?”

But there is no actual evidence that the game was fixed or rigged. If you scroll further down in the article, Huzlers identifies itself as “a combination of real shocking news and satire news to keep its visitors in a state of disbelief.”

The Super Bowl-is-rigged story falls into the satire category. There are no other reports suggesting that Super Bowl XLVIII, the first time the big game was played outdoors in a cold-weather city, was fixed.

But conspiracy theorists were out in full force trying to prove that the 2014 Super Bowl was staged. Yahoo user . . .

MORE – – –

Super Bowl 2013 Recap: The Illuminati Agenda Continues

Every now and then the psychosis of some conspiracists is so off the charts i have to question whether they’re serious or playing one, big prank.

SuperBowlFalseFlag_250pxLike millions of people, i was watching the Superbowl when half the stadium lights went out because of some kind of technical glitch. Being the skeptic i am, i jokingly said to myself, “Oh, i can’t wait to see what the conspiracists say about THIS!”

Sure enough, the conspiracists found a nefarious, hidden meaning in the Superbowl blackout. The following excerpt is from a much larger article titled “Super Bowl 2013 Recap: The Illuminati Agenda Continues” from a blog by somebody calling himself The Vigilant Citizen.

Really, if you want to howl with laughter, you should read the entire article. I almost expected an ad for antipsychotic medications to popup. You’ll love it.

Grab the popcorn, here is the excerpt from The Vigilant Citizen talking about the Superbowl blackout …

via The Vigilant Citizen

Lights Out

During the 3rd quarter of the football game, half of the lights go out. It was caused by a mysterious “anomaly” that caused the system to shut down.

315046-130205-super-bowl-blackout-e1360098835266

Considering the Illuminati sub-text of the event, I cannot help but think about the occult pseudo-meaning of having half of the stadium basking in light and having the other half being in darkness. I am not saying this happened on purpose, but it is still an interesting synchronicity. One thing is for sure, the “glitch” energized the 49ers, who scored a few touchdowns and got back in the game. All of a sudden, this lost cause became interesting and the fourth quarter was rather … thrilling. Apparently, Mercedes-Benz knew that would happen.

549824_209887435817360_219952885_n

This Mercedes-Benz magazine ad was eerily correct.

While the ad seemingly refers to the fourth quarter of the fiscal year, the literal meaning of the ad is still perplexing, considering what happened at the game.

If we combine this ad with the one I described in The 2013 Mercedes Super Bowl Commercial and its Occult Message, one can at least say that Mercedes-Benz brought a lot of strangeness to the SuperBowl.


Read the entire article Super Bowl 2013 Recap: The Illuminati Agenda Continues.

Superstition

via The Skeptic s Dictionary – Skepdic.com

“The superstitious man is to the rogue what the slave is to the tyrant.” —Voltaire

superstition 140_300pxA superstition is a false belief based on ignorance (e.g., if we don’t beat the drums during an eclipse, the evil demon won’t return the sun to the sky), fear of the unknown (e.g., if we don’t chop up this chicken in just the right way and burn it according to tradition while uttering just the right incantations then the rain won’t come and our crops won’t grow and we’ll starve), trust in magic (e.g., if I put spit or dirt on my beautiful child who has been praised, the effects of the evil eye will be averted), trust in chance (if I open this book randomly and let my finger fall to any word that word will guide my future actions), or some other false conception of causation (e.g.,  homeopathy, therapeutic touch, vitalism, creationism, or that I’ll have good luck if I carry a rabbit’s foot or bad luck if a black cat crosses my path).

black cat03_250px_02The indiscriminate power of nature is obvious. For as long as humans have been making sounds and instruments, magical methods have been created in the attempt to control the forces of nature and the life and death matters of daily existence. Good and evil befall us without rhyme or reason. We imagine spirits or intelligible forces causing our good and bad fortune. We invent ways to placate them or direct them. Many of the superstitions we developed seemed to work because we didn’t know how to properly evaluate them. There are many instances of selective thinking that might lead to a superstitious belief that something is good or bad luck, for example. The “curse of Pele” exemplifies this kind of superstition. According to one website devoted to the legend of the Hawaiian goddess Pele:

It is well known to locals on the island of Hawaii, that there is a curse upon those who take one of Pele’s lava rocks. It is said that he who takes a lava rock, is taking something from Pele and shall receive bad luck because of it. In the old days people were said to die from the curse, but now you only receive bad luck.

Every day, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park receives several rocks from people who took them home from the park and are returning them because of the bad luck they’ve had since taking the rocks. Many of these people think there is a causal connection between their taking the rocks and their perceived bad luck because their bad luck came after they took the rocks. Of course, their perceived bad luck may have happened even if they hadn’t taken any rocks from the park. Or they may not have paid much attention to the “bad luck” had they not heard there was a curse associated with taking the rocks. Such people may . . .

MORE . . .

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 801 other followers

%d bloggers like this: