Category Archives: Cryptids

Why Does Anyone Still Believe In The Loch Ness Monster?

By The Conversation via science20

big-foot-loch-nessPeople are fascinated by the unknown, by the possibility that there are things out there that are yet to be discovered.

We think that most of our planet has been mapped by satellites and continents have been thoroughly explored. Although scientists estimate that millions of species are yet to be discovered, these are mostly assumed to be very small animals, especially invertebrates.

Long gone are the days of famous explorers, when the borders of uncharted lands were marked with warnings such as “here be dragons”. And yet, many of us, still hope that some amazing, unexpected creatures may be hiding somewhere.

These creatures are the so-called “cryptids”, animals such as the Himalayan Yeti, north American Bigfoot or Australia’s own Yowie.

Perhaps the most famous is the Loch Ness monster, which has been back in the news recently, thanks to the discovery of a nine-meter long object at the Scottish lake.

Engineers prepare to tow Munin, an intelligent marine robot, on Loch Ness in search for the mysterious monster. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne

Engineers prepare to tow Munin, an intelligent marine robot, on Loch Ness in search for the mysterious monster. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne

A team of Norwegian researchers found what was initially thought to be evidence for the existence of the monster, informally known as “Nessie”.

But this evidence later turned out to be just a prop from the 1970 movie The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes, which sank after its buoyant humps were removed.

This team of researchers was using some advanced sonar technology in the hope of unveiling the mystery of Loch Ness once and for all. But the prop is all they have found so far.

Certainly, many people were disappointed. But from a scientific perspective, what are the odds that a prehistoric reptile actually inhabits the depths of Loch Ness?

Continue Reading @ science20 – – –

Why do people disappear in national parks?

Via Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know

Legends of Skinwalker Ranch

By Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know via YouTube

There’s a ranch located southeast of Ballard, Utah, bordering the Ute Indian reservation. Legally, it’s called the Sherman Ranch — but it has another name, too: the Skinwalker Ranch.

Are there living dinosaurs?

By Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know via YouTube

According to mainstream science, dinosaur populations were wiped out eons ago. Or were they? Discover why some cryptozoologists and theorists believe that dinosaurs still exist today in this episode of Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know.

Does a devil live in Jersey?

By Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know via YouTube

The legend of the Jersey Devil dates back for centuries, and hundreds of people have reported seeing the creature. Yet despite extensive searches, no one has conclusively proven its existence.

The search for the Loch Ness Monster

By Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know via YouTube

Scientists from around the world have scoured Scotland’s Loch Ness in an attempt to discover the infamous Loch Ness monster.

The Skookum Cast

The first “full body cast” of an alleged Bigfoot left many experts with a different impression.

skeptoid eyeby Blake Smith via skeptoid
Read transcript below or listen here

It’s not as famous outside of the Bigfoot research community as the other alleged evidence. The shaky films and blurry photographs appear in more documentaries, and the giant plaster foot castings are more widely recognized. But in September 2000, Patterson_bigfoota team of investigators from the Bigfoot Field Research Organization (BFRO) emerged from the woods near Skookum Meadows in Washington state with 15 square feet of plaster and Hydrocal® that they claim results from a full body impression of the mysterious man-like animal known as Bigfoot. Was this the best new evidence supporting the existence of Bigfoot since the Patterson Gimlin film? Or was it something else?

Before we dig into the question of whether or not the Skookum Cast is evidence for the existence of Bigfoot, let’s take a look at how the cast came to be taken in the first place. bigfoot-2In late 2000, the Australian television show Animal X was filming its second season. As part of a planned Bigfoot special, they sent a film crew to Washington state to meet with team members of the BFRO to look for Bigfoot evidence in the Pacific Northwest. An expedition was mounted in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. The expedition included Matt Moneymaker, Thom Powell, Rick Noll, Dr. Leroy Fish, the film crew from Animal X and several other BFRO members. For six days the team had been blasting recordings of alleged Bigfoot vocalizations, experimenting with pheromone lures, and using thermal cameras. In many ways, they were doing the same kinds of activities that would become the basis for the television show Finding Bigfoot. On the evening of the expedition’s sixth day, the team placed fruit bait near a muddy patch by the road in the hope that it might lure a Bigfoot and provide some good physical evidence. On the seventh day, September 22, the team discovered the large animal impression that would become known as the Skookum Cast.

The Skookum cast is a plaster cast often claimed to be an imprint of the body of Bigfoot, although it is more typically regarded as that of an elk (Wikipedia). Some bigfoot enthusiasts believe the cast shows the imprints of bigfoot body parts (above right).

The expedition members used 200 pounds of casting material and some tent poles to make a record of the large impression. But where were the footprints? Clearly a large animal had made the shape in the mud, but there were none of the signature tracks that have made Bigfoot so famous – and from which it gets its name. There was much discussion and finally a scenario emerged that the BFRO suggests explains the situation: A lone Bigfoot was attracted to the bait, but did not want to leave its tracks so it carefully crawled to the fruit. It then reclined on the ground in the mud while it ate the fruit, before departing in a similar trackless mode. With this theory and their 200 pounds of alleged Bigfoot evidence, team members transported the cast to an indoor location where it could be studied by scientific experts.

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25 Mythic Creatures That Never Existed But People Believed In Anyway

By list25 via YouTube

Throughout history there have been countless stories about mythical creatures, legendary monsters, and supernatural beings. Despite their unclear origin, these mythical creatures have a place in folklore and in many cases are part of pop culture. Amazingly, there are people across the globe who still strongly believe these creatures exist in spite of the lack of proof that they do. So, our list today is about 25 legendary and epic mythic creatures that never existed yet many people believe otherwise.

Shark Week Lied to Scientists to Get Them to Appear in “Documentaries”

Via io9.com

shark week rob lowe_400pxDiscovery Channel’s “Shark Week” is misleading the public again this year with several documentaries. So why are scientists allowing themselves to be featured in these pseudoscience disasters? There’s a simple reason: Shark Week producers have been lying to them.

Jonathan Davis, who now works for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, was studying the bull sharks in the Gulf of Mexico for his Masters research when he was approached by a Shark Week film crew. “They were interested in the sharks in Louisiana, and I was the person doing the research there,” Davis says. He agreed to take the film crew into the field, but quickly became concerned by their refusal to answer his questions.

He said:

I asked a few of the crew members, including the producer, what the show was going to be about. I never got a straight answer and the producer seemed to avoid the question. I was just told it would be combined with some other filming to make one show about Louisiana shark research.

surviving-shark-week-like-a-boss_250pxDavis was shocked to find that his interview aired during a 2013 Shark Week special called Voodoo Shark, which was about a mythical monster shark called “Rooken” that lived in the Bayous of Louisiana. The “other filming” his interview was combined with featured a Bayou fishermen, and the clips were edited together to make it seem like a race between his team of researchers and the fishermen to see who could catch the mythical voodoo shark faster. In reality, Davis was barely asked about the voodoo shark at all. His answers from unrelated questions were edited together to make it seem like he believed in its existence and was searching for it.

Davis explained how the hoodwinking was done  .  .  .

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