Tag Archives: California

Chemtrail Plane Interior!!!!

The photos below have surfaced showing the interior of a chemtrail plane! I didn’t believe in chemtrails – i didn’t believe there was evidence – but I may have to re-think my chemtrail beliefs!!!

But wait! There’s more!

Click here to find out more!😉

Conspiracy Theorists Think an Army Training Exercise Will Bring Martial Law to the US This Summer

Military desert
By Colleen Curry via VICE News

An unclassified document that outlines a US Army training exercise scheduled for this summer includes a color-coded map that refers to Texas as “hostile territory” and calls a portion of California an “insurgent pocket,” leading a certain fringe on the internet to claim the exercise is really a dress rehearsal for a government plot to declare martial law.

The training exercise, known as Jade Helm 15, is scheduled to take place between July 15 and September 15 across parts of Texas, California, Arizona, and New Mexico, and will involve Green Berets, Navy SEALs, and other Special Ops forces. The uproar is over a slideshow presentation that outlines the effects the exercises might have on local populations. The US Army would not confirm the legitimacy of the document.

Conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones have been screeching about imminent martial law for years.
 

The above banner is taken from his InfoWars website in the year 2000. (Read More)

On the Sleuth Journal, a website that describes itself as an independent alternative media organization and also sells “preparedness and survival items,” author Dave Hodges said the drill was actually about “the brutal martial subjugation of the people of Texas, Utah and Southern California who have risen up against some unspecified tyranny.”

“A careful analysis reveals how this drill is connected to Army policies associated with the confinement of detainees in what is commonly called FEMA camps!” Hodge wrote, describing a conspiracy theory in which the government imprisons citizens in FEMA disaster camps. “This drill is undoubtedly the most frightening thing to occur on American soil since the Civil War.”

Infowars, the conspiracy-minded site founded by Alex Jones, also published a story on Jade Helm 15, calling it a plan for the “brutal martial law takeover of America [that] labels Texas and Utah as ‘hostile’ states due to their strong cultural identities.”

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Also See: Was Alex Jones an alarmist 13 years ago or is he an alarmist today? (iLLuMiNuTTi.com)

The Santa Barbara Simoom of 1859

Santa Barbara 600px
Brian DunningBy Brian Dunning via skeptoid

Today we’re going to go back more than a century and a half to a hot summer day on the central coast of California, to the town of Santa Barbara. June 17, 1859 began as a summer day much like any other, clear with plenty of warm sunshine, plus a cool breeze to make it just perfect. But according to legend, something happened that wrought sudden death and destruction: from out of nowhere, a wind with temperatures usually reserved for baking ovens blasted down from the hills, killing animals and injuring people. It immediately set the country’s highest recorded temperature. They named it the simoom, after the hot Sahara wind of the same name. But it turns out that data is hard to come by. Was the Santa Barbara simoom a true freak of nature, or perhaps merely a tall tale told to visitors?

Here is a snippet about the 1859 simoom from the Insider’s Guide to Santa Barbara:

Until 1934, Santa Barbara had a record high temperature on the U.S. Weather Bureau’s books. On June 17, 1859, a simoom (scorching wind) swept down from the northwest, and the mercury soared to 133° Fahrenheit (about 56° Celsius). Cattle dropped dead, and birds fell from the sky. The record was topped when the mercury hit 134° Fahrenheit (about 57° Celsius) in Death Valley in 1934.

It sounds a bit like a tall tale, a perfect subject for our skeptical eye.

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Was the Santa Barbara simoom a true freak of nature, or perhaps merely a tall tale told to visitors?

Sudden, hot winds are absolutely a reality on the California coasts. They’re called the Santa Ana winds, and are the main contributors to the wildfires that can so often be so destructive to coastal communities. Dry air from the Mojave Desert and even the Great Basin further inland forms a high pressure region which cools, sending it spilling downhill toward the coast. The wind is very dry and gusts can reach hurricane forces at their strongest. The wind is usually hot, but not because it came from the desert; it gets heated on the way by adiabatic forces; basically, compression. Santa Ana winds can happen at any time of year, but are most common in the late autumn and early winter.

Although Santa Barbara is a ways up the coast from the Santa Ana winds, it is indirectly affected by them. The high pressure systems that create the Santa Anas are usually moving east, so a few days before they collapse into Santa Anas, they often cause a similar phenomenon in Santa Barbara that locals call the Sundowner. When the Sundowner winds spill over the Santa Ynez mountains and rush to the sea, they can wreak some havoc; but because their path is much shorter, adiabatic compression forces don’t have as much opportunity to heat the Sundowners as much as their more southerly cousins.

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Did thermite cause a bridge the size of a football field to collapse?

By Mason I. Bilderberg

quick note_150pxJust a quick note.

Somebody forwarded me this story about a highway overpass under construction in Herperia, California that caught fire and collapsed.

The bridge burned:

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Then, according to the article, “The blaze caused steel girders to sag into the freeway below.”

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“The blaze caused steel girders to sag into the freeway below.”

But wait one second, back up the truck. They’re not fooling me.

Didn’t the 9/11 truthers tell us that fire doesn’t get hot enough to collapse steel structures? Why, yes . . . yes, they did.

So this bridge must’ve been taken down with explosives or  thermite!!!!! Bastards!!!!!

This is a coverup! A false flag! We’re being lied to! We must demand the truth!!!! Who knew and when did they know it?

Wake up sheeple!!!!!!

MIB:)

Original story: Bridge ‘the size of of a football field’ on main freeway from Los Angeles to Las Vegas freeway collapses after construction worker accidentally sets it on fire | Mail Online

Who Sabotaged California’s power grid?

Via Stuff They Don’t Want You to Know

Thankfully, blackouts don’t occur too often in the developed world. Still, a severe storm or a malfunction can leave thousands in the dark. Though experts around the US work tirelessly to prevent disruptions, it’s nearly impossible to keep a system of this size functioning perfectly. And what if there’s another cause for a blackout? Would anyone intentionally sabotage the system — and, if so, why? The answer might surprise you.

More Fukushima Scaremongering Debunked

Mike Rothschildby Mike Rothschild via Skeptoid

Another day brings another science-free but hysteria-packed screed of terror about how radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant incident will bathe all of us in torrents of cesium-soaked death. Fukushima_250pxA few months ago, I took on one of these rambles, Gary Stamper’s not at all melodramatic “At the very least, your days of eating Pacific Ocean fish are over” and determined that nothing of the sort is even close to true, with the evidence behind it either willfully misinterpreted or simply incorrect.

Now it’s time to get the knives out for a newer piece of Fukushima scaremongering, published just over a week ago on “Activist Post.” While it’s just as wrong and hysterical as Stamper’s piece, it’s also just as popular, with 28,000 shares on Facebook already. It’s sad that far more people are drawn in by crap than in the debunking of said crap, but that doesn’t mean we stop spreading the correct message: that the radiation released by Fukushima, while serious enough to be cleaned up and monitored, is having a negligible effect on everyone but the unfortunate people living in that area.

28 Signs That The West Coast Is Being Absolutely Fried With Nuclear Radiation From Fukushima

fukushima bread 02_200pxAnd we’re off to the races: specifically, the Gish Gallop, a fallacious debating technique that involves overwhelming your opponent with information, without any regard for its accuracy. Also, I’d like to know what “absolutely fried” means. Is it measurable? Is there a unit that denotes “absolutely fried” as opposed to “mostly fried” or “somewhat fried?” How many AF’s (absolutely frieds) does the radiation from Fukushima contain? And what’s a survivable dose of AF’s? I have many questions about the science underlying this clearly scientific measuring tool.

Michael Snyder
Activist Post

According to his blurb on Activist Post, Michael Snyder is a former Washington D.C. attorney who now publishes The Truth. His new thriller entitled “The Beginning Of The End” is now available on Amazon.com.

Snyder’s site appears to be some kind of Christian doomsday prepper clearinghouse, and his novel is about (surprise) the economic collapse of America. So if you’re looking for a way to incorporate hoarding precious metals into your fellowshipping, Snyder is your man. None of this is a knock against him, but he does seem to have a vested interest in trying to convince you the world is about to end. Spoiler alert: it’s not.

The map below comes from the Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center. It shows that radiation levels at radiation monitoring stations all over the country are elevated. As you will notice, this is particularly true along the west coast of the United States.

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The name “Nuclear Emergency Tracking Center” sounds a lot like a government regulatory body. It’s so incredibly the opposite of that. The website is a slapped together map of the supposed radiation levels at nuclear sites around the world. It’s got no indication where it’s getting its information or what it means, but it does have a fee based service that will alert you to radiation spikes anywhere in the world. And Bible quotes.

Every single day, 300 tons of radioactive water from Fukushima enters the Pacific Ocean. That means that the total amount of radioactive material released from Fukushima is constantly increasing, and it is steadily building up in our food chain.

I already covered this in the Stamper piece, and why it seems much worse than it actually is. The short of it is that 300 tons of radioactive water is literally a drop in the bucket compared to the 187 quintillion gallons that make up the Pacific Ocean. Whatever radioactivity is in that water will be diluted to the point of harmlessness.

[…]
We are talking about a nuclear disaster that is absolutely unprecedented, and it is constantly getting worse.

It’s not unprecedented. Chernobyl remains the worst nuclear disaster in human history, much worse in virtually every measurable way than Fukushima.

The following are 28 signs that the west coast of North America is being absolutely fried with nuclear radiation from Fukushima…

Bring it, list. Bring it.

1. Polar bears, seals and walruses along the Alaska coastline are suffering from fur loss and open sores…

Stamper referenced the same article that Snyder does. And if I may be so bold as to quote myself: “The article Stamper links to specifically says ‘Reuters noted that preliminary studies do not support a theory that the disease is due to contamination from the tsunami-wrecked Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan.‘”

Citing an article that specifically refutes the point you’re trying to make is not the way to make that point.

2. There is an epidemic of sea lion deaths along the California coastline…

There is an epidemic of sea lion deaths along the west coast, happening for as-yet unknown reasons. But it’s sea lion PUPS dying, not sea lions as a whole. Radiation does not distinguish whether an animal is young or old, so it’s highly unlikely, if not impossible, that Fukushima has anything to do with this.

3. Along the Pacific coast of Canada and the Alaska coastline, the population of sockeye salmon is at a historic low. Many are blaming Fukushima.

Sockeye salmonSockeye salmon numbers have been in decline for decades.[/caption]And they would be wrong. Sockeye salmon stocks are low in Canada’s Fraser Basin, with experts in the field researching a number of causes for it. But it’s a decline that began in 1992, long before Fukushima was scaring the crap out of people.

4. Something is causing fish all along the west coast of Canada to bleed from their gills, bellies and eyeballs.

Just as “many” does not equal “people who understand this stuff,” “something” does not equal “Fukushima.” The link Snyder sites doesn’t even talk about “fish all along the west coast of Canada.” It mentions one school of herring found to be mysteriously bleeding. The cause of this is unknown right now, but even the biologist who discovered the herring isn’t blaming Fukushima – and she discovered them before the plume of radiation would have reached Canada.

5. A vast field of radioactive debris from Fukushima that is approximately the size of California has crossed the Pacific Ocean and is starting to collide with the west coast.

I don’t know where the “size of California” bit comes from, and I can’t find any reputable source to back it up. There is a large field of debris from the post-earthquake tsunami that will hit the west coast, but interestingly, the link Snyder cites has another link to a BBC article that says it won’t happen until March, 2014. And the debris is not likely to have anything more than traces of radioactivity.

6. It is being projected that the radioactivity of coastal waters off the U.S. west coast could double over the next five to six years.

True, and nothing to be concerned about, given how low the current radioactivity level of the west coast is. To quote Dr. Claus Boning from the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany: “The levels of radiation that hit the US coast will be small relative to the levels released by Fukushima. […] But we cannot estimate accurately what those levels will be because we do not know for certain what was released by Fukushima.”

7. Experts have found very high levels of cesium-137 in plankton living in the waters of the Pacific Ocean between Hawaii and the west coast.

This is entirely expected and in keeping with a radioactive leak. The amount of radioactivity in the plankton will continue to decay as it moves up the food chain, staying well within Japan’s newly-raised acceptable levels of becquerels per kilogram of foodstuffs.

8. One test in California found that 15 out of 15 bluefin tuna were contaminated with radiation from Fukushima.

Yet another link Snyder cited without actually reading. It references a CNN article that states: “Tissue samples taken from 15 bluefin caught in August, five months after the meltdowns at Fukushima Daiichi, all contained reactor byproducts cesium-134 and cesium-137 at levels that produced radiation about 3% higher than natural background sources.” (Emphasis mine)

A 3% increase in radiation is negligible. It’s around the same amount of additional exposure you get flying in a plane, or sleeping next to someone. If that worries you, then it’s time for separate bedrooms.

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Bad Thinking Makes Bad Things Happen

by Jamy Ian Swiss via Bad Thinking Makes Bad Things Happen

The Secret teaches that victims are always to blame, and that anyone can have anything simply by wishing.

“The Secret teaches that victims are always to blame, and that anyone can have anything simply by wishing.” – Brian Dunning

For a moment there that headline might seem like preaching the converse of “The Secret”, the toxically ignorant book promoted by the toxically ignorant Oprah. But this isn’t about the notion that thinking bad – or good – thoughts produces bad or good results. That notion is just plain dumb. (It’s also hateful because it inescapably claims that bad things happen to people because they don’t think good thoughts.)

What I mean by “bad thinking” here however is poor thinking – the inability to think critically, the inability to understand or effectively utilize science and scientific reasoning. And when that kind of bad thinking is in effect, then in fact, very bad things do happen. Not to mention: to good people. And their children.

This was evidenced yet again a few weeks ago when a study published in the journal “Pediatrics” provided further evidence that the 2010 pertussis (whooping cough) outbreak in California was partly the result of increased numbers of parents opting out of vaccinating their children.

Sometimes too much education, too much disposable income, too much free time and above all, too much good medicine and good health, can lead otherwise seemingly intelligent people to make appallingly ignorant and hazardous choices. That appears to be the case evidenced by the new study. According to a story at salon.com (quoting a report on NPR):

“… a community loses herd immunity after the vaccination rate drops below 95 percent. In 2010, only 91 percent of California kindergarteners were up to date on their shots. The researchers found that in some neighborhoods, especially those with high income and education levels, exemption rates were as high as 75 percent.”

The significant point to understand about herd immunity is that the greater percentage of vaccinated community members in turn helps protect infants, who are too young to be vaccinated, and anyone else unable to safely be given the vaccine, from contracting the disease.

Guess which child was vaccinated.

Guess which child was vaccinated.

A piece in “Scientific American” points out that, “Unvaccinated individuals in the 2010 epidemic were eight times more likely to contract pertussis than vaccinated ones. But unvaccinated individuals pose risks to the community as well. ‘It’s a choice you make for yourself and a choice you make for those around you,’ Offit [Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia] says. “Infants need those around them to be protected in order not to get sick. We have a moral and ethical responsibility to our neighbors as well as to ourselves and our children.’”

So bad thinking does make bad things happen – and in this case, not just to the people doing the bad thinking, but to other people, and to other people’s children – and since I live in San Diego, my children are at risk thanks to that bad thinking. If you don’t think that science education and critical thinking skills are important, think again. If you don’t think the skeptic movement does important work, think again. If you don’t think that educating people about how to think about psychics and Bigfoot claims has a direct connection to the unnecessary medical risk my children face thanks to bad thinking – think again.

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The Patterson-Gimlin Bigfoot Film

The true history behind the iconic Bigfoot film that launched the legend.

Brian DunningBy Brian Dunning via skeptoid

Read podcast transcript below or listen here

You’ve seen it a hundred times: the iconic picture of Bigfoot striding heavily through the clearing, arms swinging, head and shoulders turned slightly toward the camera. Bigfoot 815This famous image is frame 352 of a 16mm silent color film shot in 1967 in northern California by rancher Roger Patterson, accompanied by his friend, Bob Gimlin. The impact that this film has had on Bigfoot mythology is inestimable; and correspondingly, so has its impact upon paranormal, cryptozoological, and pop culture mythologies in general. I might well not be doing the Skeptoid podcast today if the 1967 Patterson-Gimlin film had not turned legend and fancy into concrete, tangible, see-it-with-your-own-eyes reality.

Whether or not Bigfoot exists is one question — the answer to which has not exactly whitened the knuckles of science — but the authenticity of the Patterson-Gimlin film is something else. If Bigfoot were known to be a real animal, an investigation into the authenticity of the film would make sense. If Bigfoot were known to not exist, then it would be logically moot to study the film at all; it must be a fake.

Roger Patterson and Robert Gimlin

Roger Patterson and Robert Gimlin

But for today’s purpose, we’re going to brush aside the larger question (which should never be done in real science) and focus only on this detail. We’ll assume that the existence of Bigfoot is an open question (a big assumption), and just for fun, let’s see what we can determine on whether this famous film clip is a deliberate hoax, or whether it shows a real animal, or whether there might be some other explanation. Maybe it’s a misidentification, or an elaborate film flaw, or an unknown third party hoaxing Patterson and Gimlin. There are many possibilities.

Roger Patterson died of cancer only a few years after the film was shot, and never offered any clue other than that the film was genuine. Bob Gimlin remained silent for 25 years, and ever since he began speaking about it in the 1990s he has firmly stated that he was unaware of any hoax, but allowed for the possibility that he may have been hoaxed himself. Nobody else is known to have participated, and so the only two people whom we can say for certain were present when the film was shot are both stonewalls. So we must look elsewhere.

The original film no longer exists (only copies), and there is no record of anyone ever having possessed the original print. We don’t know why, but we’re left without the original film’s leader, which would have included the date when it was developed. Thus, we have only Patterson’s word for when it was developed, so we can’t verify that the film was shot and developed on the days he claims it was. The original also would have included any other shots that were taken, such as possible alternate takes. If these were ever seen, we’d know for a fact that it was faked. So that’s one more line of evidence that is unavailable to us.

No one has ever produced documentation like receipts showing when and where the film was developed. We know when and where Patterson rented the camera, but that’s not really in dispute. He had it in his possession for plenty of time before and after the alleged date of the filming. So that’s yet another dead end. Patterson covered his tracks very effectively (no Bigfoot pun intended).

He was quite a character, and had always been. He’d been . . .

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Psychic Fail – Psychic’s Amber Alert Visions Bomb

by via Mind Soap

Another terrible situation unfolded in Southern California this week and self-described “intuitive” Pam Ragland is already positioning herself and her daughter for more media attention.  Ragland’s visions and claims have unsurprisingly turned out to be flat out wrong.

amber-alert-search_350pxAmber Alerts were sent throughout California Sunday evening for James Lee DiMaggio, suspected of abducting a 16-year-old Hannah Anderson and wanted in the death of the girl’s mother and younger brother.  The alerts were quickly expanded to Oregon and Washington.  [full story] [wiki]

Steven Gregory at KFI AM640 radio called Ragland to talk about the case and was aired on Bill Handel’s morning program on Thursday, August 8th.  The segment begins with a background on the Amber Alert search and the portion involving Pam Ragland begins at about 4:30.  Listen to the trimmed segment below:

Unfortunately for the Pam Ragland media jamboree, a little over twenty four hours after Ragland’s interview aired on KFI, the authorities found James DiMaggio’s vehicle after a man riding horseback spotted hikers he believed to be the missing pair.

Over 830 miles away from San Diego, California.

In the rugged wilderness of Idaho.

amber-alert-visions-fail_600px

failed_stamp_200pxJames DiMaggio was shot and killed by an FBI search team near Morehead Lake on Saturday, August 10th and Hannah Anderson was rescued.

The rescue of Hannah Anderson is such a positive outcome to such a tragic situation after the deaths of Hannah’s mother and younger brother.

This does not let Ragland and her discredited claims free from continued skepticism.  Here are a few observations and thoughts on the radio interview points that were discussed:

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Did Woman’s ‘Visions’ Locate Missing Boy?

Benjamin RadfordBy Benjamin Radford via LiveScience

The search for a missing 11-year-old California boy came to a tragic end recently when the body of Terry Smith Jr. was found. The boy’s mother reported him missing July 7, and his body was found three days later not far from his home in the rural town of Menifee, according to news reports.

psychic 1208A woman named Pam Ragland, who claims to have psychic or intuitive powers, is being credited by police and others as having located the boy through her visions, according to news reports.

Driven by recurring visions of the boy, a distinctive home and a tree, Ragland searched the area where the boy was last seen, and to her surprise, found a home and tree matched those in her visions, even though she lived 60 miles away and had never been there. Ragland and her children searched the area and discovered Smith buried in a shallow grave near the tree.

The case is strange and intriguing, but not unexplainable. Clues to solving the mystery may lie in psychology and statistics.

Prophetic visions?

Why don't you remember this headline?

Why don’t you remember this headline?

Because Ragland had never met the Smith family nor been to their property, how could she possibly have recognized their home from her psychic visions? The answer is simple: She very likely saw it on television. Ragland stated that she had been following the extensive news coverage about the missing boy, and that she had her first visions while she was watching a news report about the search for Smith.

Television reports included photographs and video footage of the Smith home and property, and whether or not Ragland remembered paying attention to those images, she had indeed seen the Smith property before she arrived there.

Therefore the fact that a house and tree in her vision “matched” the house and tree where Smith was finally found is not surprising, and merely evidence of her not remembering where she saw an image, not psychic powers.

Psychics or statistics?

psychic_200pxWhy would Ragland suddenly get a (correct) vision of Smith’s location? She has stated believes that she and her children are “intuitive” and that the senses, ideas and intuitions that come to her are meaningful and important.

In high-profile missing persons cases, it is common for police to be inundated with hundreds or thousands of visions, hunches, and feelings from psychics, most of which are contradictory and all of which turn out to be wrong. Despite popular belief and claims to the contrary, there is not a single documented case of a missing person being found or recovered due to psychic information.

Like Ragland, many psychics state they genuinely believe in their powers and abilities, and are sincerely trying to help. Over the course of many missing persons cases and tens of thousands of visions and predictions, eventually a few of them will turn out to be correct simply by chance.

In this case, however, Ragland’s chance of correctly guessing where Smith’s body would be found was much better than pure chance.

It is a statistical fact that . . .

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Is that a FEMA Camp? – July 14, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy:)
fema_camps_full_200px

July 14, 2013 Edition
Onizuka Air Force Station

Onizuka Air Force Station

Onizuka AFS, California

The claim: Sunnyvale, 20

What it really is: Onizuka Air Force Station was operated by the 21st Space Operations Squadron, until the base was shut down in 2010.

Point Mugu (Pacific Missile Test Center), California

The claim: Oxnard, 63,031

What it really is: Point Mugu (better known as Naval Base Ventura County) has a base population of over 19,000 personnel and over 100 tenant commands. Because of the sheer amount of people there, the base itself contains multiple buildings necessary for base operations and support.

NAS North Island, California

The claim: Coronado, 2,500

What it really is: Naval Air Station North Island is a near 100 year old Navy base located right next to the city of Coronado, and is surrounded by the city of San Diego, California.

The base hosts 23 aviation squadrons, and 80 additional tenant commands and activities. Because of this it is necessary for the base to have a large amount of support buildings located on it, and due to it’s age it is also sometimes necessary to tear down and rebuild old buildings that are no longer functional for the needs of the base.

NAS Moffett Field, California

The claim: Mountain View, 13

What it really is: Moffett Federal Airfield (which is it’s actually name) is a joint civil/military airfield and is owned and operated by the NASA Ames Research Center. The only military presence left at the airfield is the California Air National Guard and the U.S. Army Reserve.

Mare Island Naval Shipyard, California

The claim: Vallejo, 4,400

What it really is: Mare Island Naval Shipyard was one of the oldest Navy ship yards in the country and was declared a National Historical Landmark in 1975.

The shipyard was closed in 1996.

March-AFB_250pxMarch ARB, Califonia

The claim: Riverside, 6,486

What it really is: March Air Reserve Base is an Air Force Reserve base (I.E. not the main Air Force), but also contains units from the Army, Navy, and Marine Reserves as wall as the California Air National Guard.

There is also an air show there that is held every two years in March, and there have been several proposals in recent years to make the base a joint military/civilian airport.

Los Angeles Air Force Base, California

The claim: Los Angeles, 239

What it really is: Los Angeles Air Force Base is the headquarters for the Air Force’s Space and Missile Systems Center and is used for the research and development of military space systems.

Air Force photograph by Joe Juarez

Air Force photograph by Joe Juarez

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Pam Ragland, Terry Smith: No, psychics can’t help murder victims.

By Justin Peters via Pam Ragland, Terry Smith: No, psychics can’t help murder victims.

Why don't you remember this headline?

Why don’t you remember this headline?

Last Wednesday, Riverside County, Calif., authorities discovered a body they believe to be that of an 11-year-old named Terry Smith. The boy had gone missing the previous Saturday or Sunday, and authorities now believe he was killed by his half brother and then buried in a shallow grave behind the family’s house. It’s a terrible, disturbing story—and, for me, it was made worse by the baffling amount of attention that’s been given to a local psychic who claimed that her “visions” led police to Smith’s body.

Pam Ragland, who specializes in what she calls “Quantum Thought Shifting” and self-identifies as an “intuitive,” says she had visions about Terry Smith’s whereabouts—and, after calling the police and offering to help in their search, she led them right to his body. Rather than treating her claims with skepticism, or ignoring them entirely, several reporters put Ragland front and center in their coverage. The Associated Press cites a Riverside County detective named John Powers who says Ragland was indeed the one who found the body. “Powers says Ragland called a tip line about her vision, and was invited to join the search,” the story continues. “He says Ragland and her children came to the house without knowing it was the boy’s, walked on to the property and right to the partially buried body.”

The AP piece was a model of journalistic restraint compared with an online story from nbclosangeles.com, which devoted more than 20 paragraphs to Ragland and her alleged visions:

psychic-transparentShe said authorities asked her to come down to the scene; Ragland arrived with her two children on Tuesday evening. During the drive, Ragland said she had another vision—of “city lights” and the word “no.” When she arrived at the search area, she saw the view she had seen in a vision.

“It’s literally like a vision in your head, like you’re looking at something,” she said.

A searcher said the city lights represented the area they planned to explore. Ragland said, “No, he’s not there.”

Yet another example of the mystical properties of the universe? No, but it’s certainly another example of . . .

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Is that a FEMA Camp? – July 6, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy:)
escape_to_camp_fema_sticker_bumper

July 6, 2013 Edition

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California

The claim: Livermore, 7,321

LLNL_200pxWhat it really is: The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a Federally funded research and development center and is primarily funded by the Department of Energy. The facility itself is run by the University of California, Bechtel, Babcock & Wilcox, URS, and Battelle Memorial Institute in affiliation with the Texas A&M University System.

Fort Ord, California

The claim: Seaside, ?

What it really is: Fort Ord closed in 1994 and is now under redevelopment. A state park and a college is now located there. Some of the site is also used for paintball competitions.

Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center

New_fleet_200px

The claim: Monterey, ?

What it really is: The Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center is a Navy facility with the job of providing the Navy with worldwide meteorological and oceanographic support. The facility is operated by both military and civilian personnel.

Energy Technology Engineering Center, California

The claim: Santa Susana, 2,700

What it really is: The Energy Technology Engineering Center was closed in 1998 and is undergoing build removal and environmental remediation by the Department of Energy.

Edwards AFB, California

The claim: Edwards, 301,000

What it really is: Edwards Air Force Base is the home of the Air Force’s Flight Test Center and has been the test site for multiple famous military aircraft.

Because this base is a testing facility, and such a large one at that, the base would require multiple large buildings for supporting the aircraft located and tested here. Most of these buildings are located around the runways as well, and not away from them.

The base also has on base housing for families of personnel that are stationed there.

Concord Naval Weapons Station, California

concord-image2_200px

The claim: Concord, 12,000

What it really is: Concord Naval Weapons Station is a former armament storage depot built during World War Two. Much of the base in now closed and is now under consideration by the Navy for local land reuse by the city of Concord.

China Lake Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division

The claim: Ridgecrest, 1,122,177

What it really is: Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake is the Navy’s largest single largest landholding, and is the Navy’s primary research and testing facility.

The base itself only has 620 military personal there. Most of the people who work there are either civilian employees or contractors, combined which makes up a total of 5,900 civilian personal. This combined with the fact that it is in the middle of a desert makes it very unlikely that a FEMA camp could be hidden here.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Is that a FEMA Camp? – June 15, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy:)
FEMA-CAMP 954_250px

June 15, 2013 Edition

Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona

Davis-Monthan AFB

The claim: Tucson, 11,000

What it really is: A major Air Force base in Arizona.

While the base itself contains several large buildings, none of them appear to be the types you would find in a prison cam,. The base is also surrounded by numerous houses, making hiding anything like a prison camp difficult.

Little Rock AFB, Arkansas

The claim: Little Rock, 11,373

What it really is: The only C-130 training base for the Department of Defense.

While the base contains several large buildings, none of them are large enough to hold thousands of people, and appear to be for housing or plane maintenance.

Ira Eaker AFB, Arkansas
blytheville_afb_001

The claim: Blytheville, 3,931

What it really is: Eaker AFB was closed in 1994. Now the Arkansas International Airport. Originally called Blythville AFB.

Redstone Arsenal, Alabama

The claim: Huntsville, 38,000

What it really is: Redstone Arsenal is the Army’s center of testing, development, and doctrine for the Army’s missile programs. Also contains extensive wetland areas that’s maintained by the Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge.

Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

The claim: US Marine Corps Base – Presently home to 30,000 Mariel Cubans and 40,000 Albanians. Total capacity unknown.

What it really is: Actually it’s a navy base, not a Marine base.

Most of the Mariel Cubans that left Cuba actually ended up in the United States, not Guantanamo Bay, and while Cuban refugees do occasionally slip into Guantanamo Bay, the amount of refugees living there is no where near the 30,000 being claimed. In fact the most ever held there was 10,000 refugees.

There were Kosovar Albanian refugees there in the late 1990’s, but only up to 10,000 were there at the most, and it was temporary until they were later resettled in the United States, or went back home to Kosovo.

Ft. Detrick, Maryland

detrickThe claim: Biological warfare center for the NWO, located in Frederick.

What it really is: Until 1969 this army base hosted the American biological weapons program, but now it host most of the United States biological defense program.

Ft. Meade, Maryland

The claim: Halfway between the District of Criminals and Baltimore. Data needed.

What it really is: Fort George G. Meade Army base is the home to the National Security Agency, the United States Cyber Command, and the Defense Courier Service (all of which I imagine the sovereign citizens movement hates…) amongst other things.

There is also a lot of housing and even businesses around there as well. Also, while there are a bunch of large buildings in this area, none of them resemble prison camps.

The lack of information, combined with the fact that whomever made this claim didn’t even know that several intelligence agencies were located here leads me to believe that this claim is bogus.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

A map of non-existent FEMA camps.

A map of non-existent FEMA camps.

Is that a FEMA Camp? – May 26, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy:)
FEMAD_200px

May 26, 2013 Edition

Berryville, Arkansas

The claim: FEMA facility located east of Eureka Springs off Hwy. 62.

What it really is: Using Google maps I’ve found numerous large building in this area, but most of them are commercial properties, and none of them look like a prison camp.

national_guard_logoBlythville AFB, Arkansas

The claim: Closed airbase now being used as camp. New wooden barracks have been constructed at this location. Classic decorations – guard towers, barbed wire, high fences.

What it really is: Eaker Air Force Base (which is it’s actual name) was closed in 1992, and is now the Arkansas International Airport. The only military presence there is the Arkansas National Guard that uses the airport for helicopter training.

Rohwer, Arkansas

The claim: Descha County – site of WWII Japanese camps

What it really is: Only a few structures of this former camp remain.

In 1992 the camp was declared a National Historic Landmark, and is opened to the public.

Jerome, Arkansas

The claim: Chicot/Drew Counties – site of WWII Japanese camps

What it really is: There was a Japanese interment camp here, but it is long gone.

The town itself is very small, with the largest buildings there being a couple of small warehouses that are not surrounded by any fences.

pinebluffarsenalPine Bluff Arsenal, Arkansas

The claim: This location also is the repository for B-Z nerve agent, which causes sleepiness, dizziness, stupor; admitted use is for civilian control.

What it really is: The site did house BZ, but the facility the housed it was destroyed in 1999.

The site itself, while large, mostly contains small buildings used for storage.

Ft. Chaffee, Arkansas

The claim: (near Fort Smith, Arkansas) – Has new runway for aircraft, new camp facility with cap of 40,000 prisoners.

What it really is: Fort Chaffee is a National Guard base for the state of Arkansas.

The base has also been used to house refugees. In 2005 it was used to house 10,000 people affected by Hurricane Katrina. Any one of those people could have seen a prison camp there, if it was there, and yet none have.

Mather AFB, California

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Mather Air Force Base closed in 1993.

The claim: Road to facility is blocked off by cement barriers and a stop sign. Sign states area is restricted; as of 1997 there were barbed wire fences pointing inward, a row of stadium lights pointed toward an empty field, etc. Black boxes on poles may have been cameras.

What it really is: Mather Air Force Base was closed in 1993, and is now the Sacramento Mather Airport.

Barbed wire fences, stadium lights, cement barriers, stop signs, and cameras are all very common thing for public airports, and are necessary for both security and safety measures.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Debunking the Anti-Monsanto/Anti-GMO claims

via The Soap Box

conspiracy-theory-alertOn May 25, a local group held a protest near where I live to protest Monsanto and GMO foods.

The protest itself, while larger than what I actually expected, wasn’t as large as what it could have been, with maybe only about 50 to 60 people attending.

Now about a week before this protest occurred someone was going the area and putting up some posters on lamp post and electric post not only advertising the protest, but also making several claims against both Monsanto and GMO foods.

I’ve looked into these claims that were made, and this is what I have found:

1. Monsanto fights labeling laws.

This is true [read here] but only to a certain extent, and there are a lot of other companies and groups (including scientists) that oppose these laws because many of them consider them to be unfair, and/or leaves to many loop holes, and many opponents also claim that these laws are really attempts to out right ban GMO foods.

Also, when the people of California were given a chance to vote into law Proposition 37, which would have required labeling of GMO foods, the voters rejected it, so really you can’t actually blame Monsanto about that, because when given the chance, the people rejected such laws.

2. Monsanto’s propriety and legal actions harm small farmers.

Monsanto has, since the mid-1990’s, filled 145 suits against individual US farmers for patent infringement and/or breach of contract in connection with its genetically engineered seed, and while this may sound like a lot, this is actually a very small number in comparison to thousands of individual, independent farmers in the US.

Also, only 11 of these suits actually went to trial, all of which Monsanto won.

3. Scientists’ studies show severe damage to GMO-feed animals.

There was a study in 2012 by Gilles-Eric Seralini that claimed to show that rats feed GMO corn increased cancer rates in these rats compared to rats that were not feed GMO corn. This study has been highly criticized for certain unscientific methods (such as the failure to record the amounts of food the rats were feed and their growth rates) and has pretty much been debunked. [read here, here, and here]

4. Monsanto’s Agent Orange and DDT contaminate food crops and villagers abroad.

Agent Orange was only used between 1965 to 1970 by the US military in Vietnam (before then they used a herbicide called Agent Blue). Even though this was true, you really can’t blame Monsanto because they are not the ones who actually used it. It was various governments around the world who used it. Monsanto (along with Dow Chemical) just made the stuff.

As for DDT, most countries have been banning the stuff since the 1960’s for agricultural use, and again, Monsanto is not the only company that made DDT, and it doesn’t even make it anymore because of the 1972 US ban.

5. Monsanto falsely advertised it’s Roundup as “biodegradable.”

In 2007 Monsanto was convicted in France for false advertisement of it’s product Roundup as being biodegradable. France is of course the only country that has done this, and some people might even claim that this is the result of France’s environmental laws, rather than reality as Glyphosate (the technical name for Roundup) does not bioaccumulate and breaks down rapidly in the environment.

Whether or Roundup should be considered biodegradable or not seems to be more of a matter of opinion then fact.

6. Monsanto blocks regulations. It’s CEOs are in a revolving door from Monsanto to FDA (ex: Micheal Taylor, current Food Safety Czar).

This is completely false. Micheal Taylor (whomever he is) was never the Food Safety Czar. There has only been one Food Safety Czar, and that was Dr. David Acheson, and he only had that position from 2007 to 2008.

Monsanto can not actually block regulations, all it can do is lobby against laws and regulations that could affect it’s business, and there is no “revolving door”, so to speak, between Monsanto and the FDA.

MORE . . .


Also see:


Penn and Teller discuss Genetically Engineered foods and organic foods.
WARNING: ADULT LANGUAGE

Unidentified Faux Objects: News Station Fooled by UFO Phone App

Via Who Forted? Magazine

dupedguy_250pxCalifornia news station WMFD NewsWatch had a mild embarrassment on their hands this week, after they were informed that their story on an apparent UFO photograph was nothing more than the product of a readily available cell phone app.

The photo, which was taken by a resident of Mansfield named Tom Young, showed what appeared to be a disk-shaped craft floating above a small field, and it was so convincing that it caught the eye of news reporters. From there, the story spread like wild fire. Luckily OpenMedia.com recognized the silver spaceship immediately and called hoax.

The picture was created using the Camera360 smartphone app, and as WMFD discovered, it turns out Tom Young has that very same app on the cell phone he used to take his “unexplained” photo. When reporters contacted Young about the hoax, he remained firm that his photograph is of a bona fide UFO, but said he would check the photo again to make sure he didn’t “accidentally” use the app.

You have to at least applaud the guy’s audacity though, don’t you?

MORE . . .

Man ‘Controlled By Satellites’ Makes 100 Calls To 911 In A Month, Vows To Continue

Via CBS Sacramento

SACRAMENTO (CBS13) — A man who called 911 more than 100 times in one month says he’s not going to stop until his concerns are heard by the federal government.

Jimmy Shao keeps a log book of every 911 call he’s made. So many that he boasts he’s probably set a world record.

He doesn’t believe he’s wasting the time of emergency responders because he has an emergency of his own: Shao believes he’s being watched by shadowy government authorities.

He claims to believe his body is controlled by satellites.

“My brain, I can feel it starting. I’m blasted by the signals, every couple of minutes,” he said. “I yell and I scream, ‘Stop it, I don’t need this,’ but they never listen.”

Sacramento Police say he’s ignored warnings to stop calling over and over, so they arrested him for 911 abuse.

MORE . . .

Is that a FEMA Camp? – May 11, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy:)
Fema-Camps-300x280

May 11, 2013 Edition

Tule Lake, California

The claim: area of “wildlife refuge”, accessible by unpaved road, just inside Modoc County.

What it really is: It is a National Wildlife Refuge that is surrounded by farm land.

Norton AFB, California

San-Bernardino-Airport-1_250pxThe claim: (closed base) now staffed with UN according to some sources.

What it really is: The base was closed in 1994, and is now the San Bernardino International Airport.

Vandenburg AFB, California

The claim: Rex 84 facility, located near Lompoc & Santa Maria. Internment facility is located near the oceanside, close to Space Launch Complex #6, also called “Slick Six”. The launch site has had “a flawless failure record” and is rarely used.

What it really is: First, Space Launch Complex 6 has not had a flawless launch record. Second, while the launch complex hasn’t been used as much as others, it is still used (the last launch from there was in 2012).

As for the oceanside internment facility, this probably doesn’t exist due to the fact that Vandenburg AFB is located two to three miles away from the coast.

everglades_250pxPensacola, Florida

The claim: Federal Prison Camp Everglades – It is believed that a facility may be carved out of the wilds here.

What it really is: First, Pensascola is no where near the Everglades. Second, there is already a prison near the Everglades, it called the Everglades Correctional Institution. It’s run by the state, not the Federal government, and it holds minimum to medium security prisoners.

Eglin AFB, Florida

The claim: This base is over 30 miles long, from Pensacola to Hwy 331 in De Funiak Springs. High capacity facility, presently manned and populated with some prisoners.

What it really is: Eglin is a major Air Force base, it is not however over 30 miles long. It is infact only two miles long.

It once did host a prison camp, but it was minimum security, and it closed in 2006.

Camp Krome, Florida

The claim: DoJ detention/interrogation center, Rex 84 facility

What it really is: It’s an abandoned site. The only thing that’s there are a few decaying building with graffiti on them.

Avon Park, Florida

Click image for larger view.

The claim: Air Force gunnery range, Avon Park has an on-base “correctional facility” which was a former WWII detention camp.

What it really is: The base never hosted a POW detention camp, and portions of the base itself has been declared land surplus over the years and has been sold off.

There is a prison there, but it’s run by the Florida Department of Corrections, not the Federal government.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Is the Winchester House haunted?

Why does the Winchester Mystery House have stairs leading nowhere?

via HowStuffWorks

Is this sprawling mansion haunted or just oddly designed? Photo courtesy ­Winchester My­stery House, San Jose, CA

Is this sprawling mansion haunted or just oddly designed?
Photo courtesy ­Winchester My­stery House, San Jose, CA

Most of us want to get home construction over as soon as possible. We worry about the expense and complain about the inconvenience. But for Sarah Winchester, construction was a way of life. For 38 years, she had construction going 24 hours a day at her home in San Jose, Calif. This was no ordinary construction job, though; the house is an oddball labyrinth of rooms that at one point reached seven stories. It’s filled with weird things like stairs and doors that go nowhere. And I haven’t even mentioned the ghosts

Sarah Winchester didn’t always want to build a haunted mansion. Born in 1839, Sarah Pardee was one of the social stars of New Haven, Conn. Although she only stood 4 feet 10 inches, she was known for her beauty and her sparkling personality. In 1862, Sarah married William Winchester, who was the heir of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company. The company had developed the repeating rifle, a gun that was easy to reload and fired rapidly, at a rate of one shot every three seconds. The gun was used by Northern troops in the Civil War and was also known as “the gun that won the West” Silva.

winchester-mystery-house-2_300px

You won’t get far if you follow the stairs to nowhere.
Photo courtesy Winchester Mystery House, San Jose, CA

The young couple started a family in 1866, but their daughter, Annie, died in infancy, a blow that Mrs. Winchester never recovered from. Mr. Winchester died of tuberculosis 15 years later. Distraught over these losses, she visited a medium for spiritual guidance.

The medium told her that the Winchester family had been struck by a terrible curse and was haunted by the ghosts of all those killed by the Winchester rifle. Their spirits were seeking vengeance, and the only way to appease them was to build a house for them. The ghosts had another request: that the house never be completed. Never stop building, the medium told Mrs. Winchester, or you will die. We can’t know exactly how she interpreted this advice; she might have thought the spirits would get her if she stopped, or she might have seen continuous construction as a path to eternal life.

Mrs. Winchester headed west to build a home for herself and her ghosts. She bought a six-room farmhouse on 162 acres in California and set to work building, a task that would occupy her until her death 38 years later. But how did she end up with such a weird house? Why did she construct stairs that went nowhere and doors that opened into walls?

Find out on the next page . . .

I Doubt It and Maybe You Should, Too

Sharon_hill_80pxBy Sharon Hill via The Huffington Post

On the hill behind my yard where I grew up, there was an Arborvitae tree in the shape of Sasquatch — small pointy head, huge shoulders and massive long body.

The outline of this monstrous Bigfoot looming in the darkness caused me a little anxiety as I rushed from the car to the house. I grew up fascinated by monsters, ghosts and strange things. They seemed real, out there in the woods, in the cemetery, or just beyond my senses. in search of title_300pxI checked out every book about monsters, haunted houses and UFOs from my school libraries. I learned about Loch Ness and psychic powers on In Search Of… with Leonard Nimoy. I can’t really explain why I was interested in these things or why I still am. But I’m certainly not the only one. Ghost hunting and monster tracking is a popular hobby these days thanks to cable TV programming.

My views about the paranormal and the mysterious have radically evolved since childhood. My opinion has swung like a pendulum from belief to disbelief and I progressively ended up in the center. I learned how to apply scientific skepticism. Skepticism is a process of evaluating things by emphasizing evidence and the tools of science. It’s an approach that I personally adopted and practiced. Why? Because I didn’t want to be fooled. I didn’t want to swallow a comforting story when I would rather have the truth.

The younger me, the Bigfoot believer, assumed that Bigfoot is out there. Why not? I mean, hundreds of people tell of their experiences of seeing, smelling, hearing or otherwise experiencing something that they attribute to our popular description of Bigfoot/Sasquatch. bigfoot-1Books are filled with stories. Stories are a gift to humanity but they are far from being hard data. Pictures of footprints and dark blobs are questionable. There’s hair here and there. There is also that famous film — named for those who captured the images, Patterson and Gimlin — taken of a large hairy creature striding rapidly across a California creek bed only to glance back and reveal her face for a moment.

I don’t have enough information to make a pronouncement on all the evidence. But it’s a logical error to say “why not?” when we really need to ask “why?” Why should I believe in this extraordinary creature? In the 50 years after that iconic film, the evidence for Bigfoot still consists of mainly lots of stories that can’t be double-checked. The rest of the evidence remains questionable — possible mistakes, misinterpretations, and a slew of hoaxes. After 50 years, we are no closer to finding Bigfoot. There is no body. The clues do not converge on a solid explanation. As much as I want to think that the creature is out there, strong evidence for it is still lacking.

Skepticism is a valuable thing to practice in proportion — not too much, not too little. This approach can be highly valuable when you are dealing with medical treatments, consumer products or investment. You can apply the same approach to other questionable claims like UFOs or psychics.

Sure, there is a downside. When you dig into the mysteries, they become . . .

MORE . . .

(Leonard Nimoy) In Search Of… Bigfoot

Rethinking the Great Los Angeles Air Raid of 1942

Battle-LA-585x306

By Micah Hanks via Mysterious Universe

Few wartime incidents have been so compelling, and controversial, in the eyes of modern ufologists as that famous “battle” which took place in the skies above Los Angeles in the early morning of February 25, 1942. While conventional history maintains that the entire ordeal had been the result of “war nerves,” UFO researchers have scoffed at the assertion that an object allegedly seen in the skies above Los Angeles that evening had simply been meteorological balloons (see Wesley Craven and James Cate’s 1983 The Army Air Forces in World War II: Defense of the Western Hemisphere for more on the official analysis of the incident). 

The story is well known by now: a strange object appears on radar, moving in slowly toward land from off the Pacific, and soon there are reports buzzing about sightings of Japanese planes over California. Artillery fire ensues, lasting until around 4:14 AM, causing damage to buildings, and even a handful of deaths throughout the panic-stricken city, with reports of disabled Japanese fighter planes crashing to the ground.

The story has remained sensational, largely due to the interest and assertions of UFO researchers; in the past, I too have questioned, on occasion, how a misidentified aircraft of any kind might sustain an onslaught lasting nearly an hour and a half, courtesy of 12.8 pound anti-aircraft shells.

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Hoax?
(Click image for larger view)

For all we know, maybe the root of the mystery really does have to do with an exotic aircraft… and to be fair, maybe weather balloons are still just as worthy of consideration. But over the years, there has been enough misinfo presented by both sides–favoring skepticism as well as belief–to almost forever color the waters around this strange and scary incident. So what happened on that February night over Los Angeles, and was California really visited by an unknown aircraft capable of sustaining long-term firing well into the morning hours?

Over the years, there have been a number of bad reports–some of them outright hoaxes–that have been passed along as “evidence” of something strange in the skies over Los Angeles in 1942. Back in 2010, I had taken particular interest in reports appearing at various sites online that alleged the object seen over LA that evening had resembled a giant butterfly. The specific source being cited for these claims had been The Reno Evening Gazette February 26, 1942 edition, thus resulting in a few Fortean scholars who began to draw parallels between the LA air raid of ’42 and later “Mothman” reports emanating from Point Pleasant, West Virginia, during the late 1960s. Like many others, I was intrigued by this, and so I decided to see if I could hunt down an old microfilm copy of this edition of the Gazettesure enough, I located the paper thanks to a little help from an amateur historian friend of mine, with the famous headline emblazoned across the frontpage that read, “Los Angeles Confused Over Air Raid Alarm.” My search for a large Fortean fluttering beast had begun, but the biggest surprise came at the end, when it became clear that . . .

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2 Psychics Arrested, 3rd Sought

via CBS Denver

psychic_300pxDENVER (CBS4) – One Denver psychic has been convicted of theft, a second was arrested this month in California and Denver prosecutors are still seeking to arrest a third psychic accused of convincing clients she was a “witch doctor.”

Ralph Stevenson, an investigator with the Denver District Attorney’s Economic Crimes Unit, said victims have described the psychics as being akin to “witch doctors,” making grapefruits bleed, tomatoes taste like salt and cracking eggs open and producing gooey black yolks.

“In these cases, where after they’ve paid money for services rendered, they take additional money, I believe through theft and deception, through magic and things like that and then don’t give money back to the victims … that’s when we get involved,” said Stevenson.

Denver psychic Cathy Ann Russo is currently on probation after being pleading guilty last August to felony theft and misdemeanor theft. Over the course of five years, beginning in 2007, Russo conned a Hispanic man out of $35,250. according to court records.

She told him his money had “evil spirits” and that she needed to pray on his money to rid the cash of its evil spirits. She promised the man she would return the money to him as soon as his cash was cleansed. At one point, she told the man she had buried his money in a graveyard.

MORE . . .

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UFOs swooping down on Cotulla?

Group says some can’t be explained

by Eric Gonzales / KENS 5 via kens5.com San Antonio

Eagle Ford is a hot spot for oil, but in the past few weeks it has turned into the mother ship for UFO sightings.  It seems Cotulla, Texas has become ground zero for UFOs in the past few weeks—if recent YouTube postings can be believed.

Several videos have been posted on YouTube showing different sightings in the Cotulla area. One UFO video was posted two days ago.

Xfiles_200pxThe Mutual UFO Network is a national organization that investigates UFO sightings.

MUFON says they have been getting a lot of calls from South Texas. The group says they can solve 80 to 90 percent of the cases they follow. It’s the other 10 percent that they get excited about.“Probably the fireballs— we’re not real sure what those are,” said MUFON investigator John Cross. “We think they switched over to jet-powered drones.”

MUFON says California, Texas and Detroit are the hot spots for sightings right now.

They say the videos out of Cotulla this past week can be easily solved.

“It really doesn’t display any unusual flight patterns of any kind, and as you watch the video towards the end you can clearly see all three of the beacons on the aircraft,” Cross said.

Also See: MUFON Case Management System (SEARCH CASES) – pictures, movies, etc..

UFO Photo of “Vintage” Flying Saucer Purportedly Snapped, But..

via Who Forted? Magazine

Click image for larger view

Click image for larger view

A student in Sakon Nakhon, Thailand claims to have unwittingly snapped a photo of a “vintage-looking” flying saucer on Christmas day, stirring some talk over whether or not the extraterrestrials have a thing for classic vehicles.

During an afternoon of “Sport Day” festivities scheduled by the Sawang Dindaeng School on December 25th, Thidarat Boonlee whipped out her cell phone to take a photo of the grandstands where her friends were seated. However, upon going back and reviewing the snapshot, Boonlee claims to have found something strange hovering just through the trees. When she went to snap another photo, the craft was gone.

Weeyaros Yuttarin, an English teacher at Boonlee’s school, claims that UFO sightings have been on the rise in the area.

“I heard many teachers talking about their UFO experience on the same day, but I did not believe since there was no concrete evidence,” Weeyaros told The Phuket News (tee-hee). He also stated that he didn’t believe Boonlee would make such a story up.

Ah, but in the age of camera phone apps that will let you insert ghosts into your photos with a tap of the screen, what are the chances that this photo could be a joke that got a bit out of hand? Pretty high, actually, according to the sleuths at the Above Top Secret forums.

They dug up this photo contains a UFO snapped in California, reported to MUFON at the end of December. Looks familiar no? And if that wasn’t enough evidence for you, have a look at the UFO Camera GOLD app available on the itunes marketplace, loaded with classic images of flying saucers that you can add to your photos “like magic”. The developers even promise that your UFO pictures will be “better than Mulder’s”.

Blasphemy.

If you speak Thai, you can watch this clip of newscasters being duped by a high schooler and actually understand it.

Scientists suggest we might be overlooking alien communications

via www.digitaljournal.com

grey1_1A new theory has been put forward in the astrophysics world suggesting people have assumed too much when looking for alien attempts to communicate with Earth.

The theory, proposed by James Benford, his son, Dominic Benford, and Jame’s twin brother Gregory Benford, published in two papers in June, have generated a great deal of excitement in the science world. The Benfords looked at the issue of communications and concluded that aliens, much like humans, would want to economize their resources where possible, and thus they would not send out communications resembling what scientists have expected would be sent. Instead, the scientists suggest, aliens might be as frugal with expensive resources as humans are.

The University of California Irvine said extraterrestrials might have been trying to contact Earth all along, but because scientists were looking for something different, the messages were missed. The trio of scientists believe extraterrestrials might send out short messages, or pulses. James explained, saying

“This approach is more like Twitter and less like War and Peace.”

James is a physicist as well as the founder and president of Microwave Sciences Inc. in Lafayette, California. Dominic is a scientist with NASA, and Gregory is an astrophysicist with the University of California Irvine. The new hypothesis is based on an old adage. Gregory explained …

MORE . . .

Bigfoot Sightings & Pictures: Hoaxes and Cases of Mistaken Identity

via LiveScience

Bigfoot, also known as Sasquatch, is a giant ape-like creature that is said to roam the Pacific Northwest. There is scant physical evidence that such creatures exist, but Bigfoot buffs are convinced that they do, and that science will soon prove it.

While most sightings of Bigfoot occur in the Northwest, the creatures have been reported all over the country. There are many native myths and legends of wild men in the woods, but Bigfoot per se has been around for only about 50 years. Interest in Bigfoot grew rapidly during the second half of the 20th century, spurred by magazine articles of the time, most seminally a December 1959 “True” article describing the discovery of large, mysterious footprints the year before in Bluff Creek, California.

If you don’t believe in Bigfoot (singular or plural), you’re not alone. According to a 2007 Baylor Religion Survey, only 16 percent of Americans said that Bigfoot “absolutely” or “probably” exist, with 44 percent responding “probably not” and about 40 percent saying that they “absolutely [do] not” exist. (In contrast, over twice as many people believe in ghosts or astrology.) [Infographic: Tracking Belief in Bigfoot]

Eyewitness evidence

By far the most common evidence for Bigfoot is eyewitness reports. Unfortunately, this is also by far the weakest type of evidence. Psychologists and police know that eyewitness testimony is notoriously unreliable, and that people are simply not very good at accurately describing something they saw — especially at a distance in low light and when the subject is partially hidden by trees and foliage (as most Bigfoot reports are).

A frame from the film by Roger Patterson and Bob Gimlin.

Anyone can be mistaken, and pilots, policemen, priests, and public officials are no exception. Most Bigfoot researchers admit that the vast majority of sightings are mistakes or hoaxes (up to 95 percent, by some estimates). Still, they insist that a Bigfoot must be hiding in that tiny portion of sightings and reports that can’t be easily explained.

Photographic evidence

The most famous image of a Bigfoot is the short film taken in 1967 by Roger Patterson and Bob Gimlin. Shot in Bluff Creek, Calif., it shows a dark, man-sized and man-shaped figure striding through a clearing. Widely considered a hoax, it remains to this day the best evidence for Bigfoot. However this poses a serious blow to the film’s credibility: if it’s real, and these Bigfoot creatures are really out there wandering in front of people with cameras, it’s very suspicious that better films and videos haven’t emerged since Lyndon Johnson’s administration.

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Massive Sydney And California Tsunamis Coming?

From the land of quackery comes the man who “predicted” the Japanese earthquake. He has now predicted a massive earthquake/tsunami that will decimate everything in sight – like Godzilla stomping through Hong Kong! Be frightened. Be VERY frightened! Not.

This is going to be a very public fail. Enjoy.

via disclose.tv

August 7, 2012 – You might remember the man who apparently predicted the Japanese earthquake and tsunami: Mitchell Combes? Story is that he posted a 104 hour countdown to the earthquake on his Facebook page and got it 100% correct. Different thoughts and ideas circulate as to whether that was a legit prediction or not.

Nonetheless he has just posted his first real prediciton since the Japanese earthquake and tsunami, and if he is correct, we are in for a massive global incident very shortly.

Here is what he posted about 45 minutes ago on his Facebook page (see image above):

“Ok everyone, you’ve been warned of what’s to come, we are getting extremely close to the 104 hour tsunami warning. I strongly advise that if you live on the east coast of NSW and west coast of USA, have your evacuation gear ready to go as soon as possible. I said on March 11 that California would be next after Japan’s countdown… Sydney’s earthquake will be magnitude 9.5, California’s earthquake will be magnitude 9.6, followed by two 9.4’s, all of these tsunamis will be created in the same exact hour.”

Will he be correct?

Keep Reading:  Massive Sydney And California Tsunamis Coming?.

Batman on the Couch: Psychologist Analyzes Comic Book Character

He wears a caped bat costume in public and funds an alter ego out of his personal fortune. As a child he witnessed his parents’ murders; as an adult, he puts his own life on the line, practicing a personal brand of vigilante justice.

He may be a comic book character, but Batman provides fertile ground for a psychologist, and California clinical psychologist Robin Rosenberg has taken up the challenge.

Keep Reading: Batman on the Couch: Psychologist Analyzes Comic Book Character | LiveScience.

Debunked: KMIR6 Geoengineering the Skies (chemtrails)

Related Links:

via Debunked: KMIR6 Geoengineering the Skies (chemtrails) – YouTube.

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