Tag Archives: canada

NASA Faked Mars Landings: Mars Rover Photos Were Taken In Simulated Mars Environment On Devon Island, Canada, According to Conspiracy Theorists

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Via: Inquisitr

A conspiracy theory fast gaining traction online makes the astounding claim that NASA’s Curiosity and Opportunity rovers never traveled to Mars and that the images of the Martian environment being uploaded to NASA websites were actually taken on a remote island called Devon Island in Canada, the largest uninhabited island on Earth.

mars yankee go homeAccording to the rumors making the rounds in the conspiracy theory blogosphere, the pictures being uploaded regularly to NASA’s websites and palmed off as images of the Martian environment are fake images taken on Devon Island in Canada where NASA has set up a landscape identical with the “Martian landscape” we see on photos NASA scientists upload to NASA websites.

Conspiracy theorists claim that the rovers never traveled out to space, let alone land on Mars. Rovers Opportunity and Curiosity are being kept in storage in one of NASA’s facilities. Meanwhile, the agency has deployed two smaller versions of the rovers — “baby rovers” — on Devon Island in Canada.

NASA maintains permanent bases on Devon Island where NASA personnel dressed in mock astronaut suits play around with “baby rovers” fitted with cameras. Conspiracy theorists note that the terrain of the island bears a striking resemblance to the images of the “Martian environment” that NASA uploads to its websites. This makes the island an ideal location on Earth for NASA to stage make-believe Martian environment photo shoots.

There is also evidence, according to conspiracy theorists, that NASA has bases in other remote areas used for simulating Martian environment.

Continue Reading @ Inquisitr – – –

The Baldoon Mystery

Baldoon Mystery Headline
The surprising truth behind Canada’s most famous ghost story.

Brian DunningBy Brian Dunning via skeptoid
Read transcript below or listen here

Today we’re going to go back in time nearly two centuries, to the Great Lakes region of Canada. What is today an expanse of flat, rectangular agricultural fields cleft by winding rivers was then a land of wild green abundance, and the white settlers were blending in with the native Ojibwe peoples. In 1829, the family of John McDonald had a picturesque two-story frame house in a Scottish settlement named Baldoon, near the town of Wallaceburg, Ontario.McDonald Home_300px The story goes that the family suffered an extraordinary series of poltergeist attacks culminating in their house being burned to the ground; whereupon they moved in with their father nearby only to have the attacks continue unabated. While many Canadians today still consider the Baldoon Mystery to be their greatest ghost story, it leaves skeptical researchers an interesting problem on how to regard stories that are so old and so thinly documented.

The Baldoon story has been told and retold so many times over the centuries, and written up in so many histories by so many different authors, that there is considerable variance among the versions. But the gist of the tale is like this. Disturbances began plaguing the family in 1829, mainly consisting of small objects like lead bullets striking people harmlessly as if thrown by unseen hands. But the disturbances increased to a nearly constant bombardment, as described by Neil McDonald, John’s son, who wrote it up in his book:

The dishes of water would rise of their own accord from the table, the tongs and shovel bang against each other on the hearth, the chairs and tables fall over with a loud crash, and even that sober domestic creature, the kettle on the hearth, would toss off its lid, tip over on one side, and suddenly, as if seized by unseen hands, dash itself in a paroxysm of fury on the floor. An Indian knife, with a blade ten inches long, was violently dashed against the window frame and its blade stuck fast in the casement.

Neil wrote of many visitors who witnessed such incidents firsthand, and even included the statements offered by 26 family members, relatives, and neighbors who were there and were party to the strange events. But the worst was yet to come:

At last, one day the crisis came. Worn out with anxious watching, the unhappy man was becoming desperate, when flames burst from a dozen sources in his dwelling. No time to save his household goods; the fire razed his habitation to the ground. Not even his coat was saved, and he saw the home to which he had so lately led his happy bride, bouyant with future hope, strewed to the winds in ashes.Baldoon Mystery fire_225px

The family moved in with John McDonald’s father next door, but the events persisted. Neil wrote about the thrown objects as if they were nearly constant, especially the strange cases of objects like rocks and bullets being thrown in wet as if they’d just been taken from the river outside. Sometimes, the family would mark such stones and throw them back into the river, only to have them thrown back in later with the same markings; an event strange enough to safely exclude any mere human mischief as the cause.

The family moved out again, finding no refuge in a new temporary home, and so resolved to return and stay in a tent outside their own home. A number of authorities came to the house . . .

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Canada’s former defense minister: aliens will give us tech if we quit wars

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By via Boing Boing

Paul Hellyer was Canada’s Minister of Defense in the mid-1960s. He is now a critic of the United States’ willingness to trigger an interstellar war with aliens—aliens who might give us more advanced technology if only we were less belligerent.

alien weapon_250px“They’ve been visiting our planet for thousands of years,” Hellyer told RT’s Sophie Shevardnadze in a televised interview.

“There’s been a lot more activity in the last few decades, since we invented the atomic bomb. and they’re very concerned about that, and about the fact that we might use it again,” added Hellyer, who said that a cold-war era commission determined that at least four alien species had come to Earth. “The whole cosmos is a unity, and it affects not just us but other people in the cosmos, they’ve very much afraid that we might be stupid enough to start using atomic weapons again. This would be bad for us and bad for them too.”

Scientists are at fault for dismissing the evidence of “authenticated” alien contacts, added the longest-serving member of Queen Elizabeth Canada Privy Council. “This information is top secret in the way that government isn’t talking about it, but if you talk to the whistleblowers … there’s a lot of information and it doesn’t take a lot of effort to find it”

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Is that a FEMA Camp? – September 22, 2013

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy🙂
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September 22, 2013 Edition

AFMETCAL_200pxNewark AFB, Ohio

The claim: Newark, 70

What it really is: The actual name of the facility is the Air Force Metrology and Calibration Program Office, and it is the primary manager of metrology services for the Air Force.

Mound Laboratory, Ohio

The claim: Miamisburg, 306

What it really is: Mound Laboratories was a Cold War nuclear weapons research facility. The facility was declared a Superfund site in 1989, and was eventually cleaned up.The facility has since closed and is now open for commercial development.

Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio

The claim: Fernald, 1,050

LogoRock8197D96_0_200pxWhat it really is: The Fernald Feed Materials Production Center was a uranium processing plant that made uranium fuel cores for nuclear weapons. The facility closed in 1989 and the surrounding area has since been turned into a nature preserve.The facility gained notoriety in 1984 when it was learned that the plant had been releasing millions of pounds worth of radioactive dust into the atmosphere, contaminating the surrounding area and costing $4.4 billion to clean up the site.

Grand Forks AFB, North Dakota

The claim: 25 B61-7 gravity bombs; 60 B83 gravity bombs, Emerado, 5,418 (missile field covers an additional 8,500 sq. miles)

What it really is: The Grand Forks Air Force Base is your typical Air Force base out in the middle of no where with nothing that you wouldn’t typically find on any other Air Force base.

Cavalier AFS, North Dakota

621px-Air_Force_Space_Command_200pxThe claim: Concrete, ?

What it really is: Cavalier Air Force Station is a small Air Force facility with both members from the US and Canadian military stationed there, as well as civilian employees.The station monitors for and tracks potential missile launches against North America, as well as tracks half of all Earth orbiting objects.

Seymour Johnson AFB, North Carolina

The claim: Goldsboro, 3,233

What it really is: Seymour Johnson Air Force Base is basically your typical Air Force base.After looking at the base via Google maps I can find nothing there that resembles a prison camp or anything that one would not find on an Air Force base.

Seneca Army Depot, New York

The claim: Romulus, ?

11730132-large_200pxWhat it really is: Seneca Army Depot was closed in 2000, and is now under control by numerous private industries, and as for the state the site hosts the Five Points Correctional Facility and the Seneca County Law Enforcement Center.Currently there is much discussion on what to do with the rest of the land, being that much of it is dotted with concrete storage bunkers that were used to store munitions.

Plattsburgh AFB, New York

The claim: Plattsburgh, 4,879

What it really is: Plattsburgh Air Force Base was closed in 1995 and is now a civilian airport called the Plattsburgh International Airport, and a industrial complex.

Niagara Falls Storage Site, New York

niagarafallsThe claim: Lewiston, 191

What it really is: The Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station (it’s actual name) is an Air Force reserve base that shares runways with the Niagara Falls International Airport.Currently the only aircraft stationed at the base are C-130 transport planes.

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, New York

The claim: Niskayuna and West Milton, 4,070

What it really is: The Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory is a research and development facility dedicated to the research, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of the US Navy’s nuclear powered warships.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Wi-Fi, Smart Meters, and Other Radio Bogeymen

Are common radio transmitters carcinogenic or otherwise harmful?

Brian DunningBy Brian Dunning via skeptoid.com (2011)
Read transcript below or listen here

Today we’re going to point the skeptical eye at popular claims that ordinary radios — such as walkie talkies, police and emergency radios, and those embedded in devices such as cell phones, wi-fi hubs, and smart utility meters — are dangerous. Some say they cause cancer, some say they present other more nebulous health risks. How concerned do you need to be that something as ubiquitous as radio could be doing you more harm than good?

wifi ouch_300pxThis issue rose to the headlines in popular media with a frightening announcement in May of 2011 by the World Health Organization. The press release stated that the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) had placed radiofrequency (RF) in their Group 2B of possible carcinogens due to an increased risk of the brain cancer glioma associated with the use of mobile phones. Unfortunately, very few people actually read the release, and saw only that headline, which presents a highly skewed perspective of what was actually said. As a result, new movements arose worldwide, notably in Canada, for certain RF devices to be banned. Canada’s Green party openly called for the elimination of wi-fi computer networks in schools, and many groups have campaigned against the purported health effects of smart meters (like this and this).

coffee_200pxMy question to the groups actively campaigning against stuff that’s in Group 2B is “Do you drink coffee?” Most do, and yet coffee is also in Group 2B. So are the crafts of carpentry and joinery. Pickled vegetables, coconut oil, and even the Earth’s magnetic field are in Group 2B. Now, granted, it would be fallacious logic to say that just because these other things sound ordinary and safe, that makes radiofrequency safe; but it is true that the World Health Organization considers them to be similarly risky.

Group 1 is the classification for things that have been found to be carcinogenic. This includes ultraviolet radiation, tobacco, and plutonium.

Group 2A is the classification for probable carcinogens, things that have not yet been found to cause cancer but for which there is good evidence they might. This includes engine exhaust and working in the petroleum industry.

Group 2B is the list of possible carcinogens, which are things that have not been found to cause cancer but for which there is cause to study further. It is a list of items which have not — repeat, not — been found to be carcinogenic. Will they tomorrow? Maybe, but they’re not now, according to what we know so far.

If the World Health Organization is the authority whose word you’re going on, then you should look at what they actually say. Their position paper on radio frequencies and electromagnetic radiation states unequivocally that:

…Current evidence does not confirm the existence of any health consequences from exposure to low level electromagnetic fields.

Nor should we expect such consequences. Radiofrequency is all around us, and always has been. Tune any radio to a station containing static and what you’re hearing is normal background radiation. About 1% of that static is actually left over from the Big Bang. But just because radiofrequency is natural for all living beings throughout the universe, that doesn’t mean it’s safe. To determine whether something is safe, we look at the data. So let’s look at what we know so far.

electromagnetic03
The electromagnetic spectrum is pretty simple to understand. It starts at the low end with a frequency of zero, up through the radio frequencies, past visible light and up through gamma rays and onto infinity, with higher and higher frequencies. The frequencies at the lower end are what we call non-ionizing, because they lack sufficient energy to strip electrons and change chemistry. The frequencies at the higher end are ionizing, which makes it damaging to living tissue. The dividing line between the two is the upper end of visible light, where ultraviolet begins. A sunburn is actually tissue damage caused by ionizing radiation; that UV has enough energy to just barely penetrate the outer layer of your skin. But as we go even higher, into the X-ray range, the radiation is energetic enough to penetrate all the way through your body. X-rays can be stopped by the lead-lined blanket they give you. But even higher energy frequencies, like the strongest cosmic rays, can go all the way through the entire planet.

So remember that dividing line. Visible light, like that inside your home, is generally safe as are all the radio frequencies below it. Ultraviolet light, and everything higher, is damaging.

Yet claims persist of harm from non-ionizing radiation, and they’ll often cite studies showing a biological effect from some manifestation of radio. There are only a handful of such studies which are repeatedly cited, in comparison to the more than 25,000 studies surveyed by the WHO that found no reason for concern.

Perhaps the most vocal of all the anti-radio activists is . . .

. . . MORE . . .

Fake chemtrail letter hits DWK (Canada)

by Wayne Moore – Kelowna via West Kelowna News – Castanet.net

The District of West Kelowna is the latest municipality to come forward saying it has been the subject of a fraudulent letter concerning chemtrails.

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In a news release issued late Wednesday, the municipality states:

Business owners and residents are advised to disregard a letter using the name District of West Kelowna and bearing a logo resembling the District’s that is being circulated in the community. This letter claims to be from the District’s Environment Department, signed by Susan Smith and involves chemtrails. The District of West Kelowna does not have an Environment Department, nor an employee named Susan Smith and is not distributing letters regarding chemtrails.

West Kelowna RCMP has been advised that these false letters are being distributed in this community. The District of West Kelowna welcomes any information regarding who is responsible for the distribution of these false letters. Information can be provided by calling 778-797-1000.

West Kelowna is the third Okanagan municipality to confirm such a letter using the municipal logo.

On Tuesday both Penticton and Kelowna confirmed letters using their logo was also being distributed.

[END]

via West Kelowna News – Castanet.net

Is that a FEMA Camp? – June 29, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
transparent
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy🙂
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June 29, 2013 Edition

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

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National Defence Headquarters in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

The claim: Dept. of National Defense reserveWhat it really is: The Department of National Defence is largest employer there, which means is that it employs both military and civilians. The largest base in Canada (in terms of personnel) CFB Halifax, is surrounded by both residential and commercial buildings, which would make it very difficult to hide an interment camp there (not to mention there isn’t much space there to build a prison camp either).

Ft. Providence, Northwest Territories, Canada

The claim: Located on Great Slave Lake.What it really is: A small village located next to a lake with a poorly chosen name…There are a couple of large buildings there. One happens to be a elementary school, and the other a college.

Ft. McPherson, Northwest Territories, Canada

The claim: Very cold territory ~ NW Territories.What it really is: A small village in the Northwest Territories of Canada. There’s some houses, a small airfield, a couple of abandoned quarries, and quiet a few same lakes, but that’s it.

Ft. Nelson, British Columbia, Canada

fort nelson_200pxThe claim: Northernmost point on the BC Railway line.What it really is: It’s a town in Northern British Columbia with a population of around 3,900 and a large amount of seasonal tourism. The area also has major natural gas reserves, including a large natural gas field a couple of mile south of the town.

Wainwright CFB, Alberta, Canada

The claim: halfway between Medicine Hat and Primrose Lake.What it really is: It’s a training base that at any given time will have about 1,000 personal located on the base, which grows during the summer when reservists undertake annual training there.

Primrose Lake Air Range, Alberta, Canada

The claim: 70 miles northeast of Edmonton.What it really is: First, the base is called Canadian Forces Lake Cold Lake, not Primrose Lake Air Range.While the base does have several large buildings there, most of them are either hangers or other support facilities for the base itself. There is also civilian housing there and a cadet summer training facility there too.

Suffield CFB, Alberta, Canada

r-CFB-SUFFIELD-large570_200pxThe claim: just north of Medicine Hat, less than 60 miles from the USA.What it really is: Canadian Forces Base Suffield is the largest base for the Canadian military (after looking are the place via Google maps I can tell you that it is huge), and is used for defense development and research by the Canadian military, and as a training base for the British.Not only is the base very vast, it also doesn’t contain that many buildings, and none are large enough, or in large enough concentrations to even look like a prison camp.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

5 things I’ve noticed about… FEMA camps

Via The Soap Box

FC_fema-1_300pxI’ve done quite a bit of research into “FEMA camps” (which is a conspiracy theory that claims that the government has constructed these prison camps around the country that are to be run by FEMA to hold American citizens in that disagree with the government) and there are several things that I’ve noticed about these camps.

So here are five things I’ve noticed about FEMA camps:

5. There are apparently a lot of them.

According to many conspiracy theorist websites, there are hundreds of FEMA camps scattered across the United States and Canada.

While the numbers tend vary from website to website, some report as few as 300 “identified” FEMA camps, and perhaps as many as over 900 “identified” FEMA camps.

I find it amazing that so many of these camps have been “identified”, yet the only people they have caught the attention of are conspiracy theorists (particularly those in the Sovereign Citizens/Patriot Movement). Of course these numbers really don’t mean anything, because…

4. They can be anywhere.

Also according to many websites that promote the FEMA camp conspiracy theories, FEMA camps can be just about anywhere, be it a military base, a hospital, a prison, a warehouse, an airport, a rail depot, a seaport, any place with a fence with barbed wire at the top…

Oh, and any place that has an open field and is open to the public. Those places can also apparently be FEMA camps too.

3. Apparently they’ve been around for a while.

ALEXJONESFOIL_250pxFrom the research I’ve done into these FEMA camp claims, I have found that these claims have been around for a long time.

The first time I actually heard someone claim these places were real was back in the mid-1990’s, and I have found out these claims are even older, even going back as far back as the 1970’s.

It’s kind of strange that FEMA camps have apparently been around for so long, and yet the government has yet to use them, or enact this fascist “police state” plan that many conspiracy theorists claim is going to happen when the government starts shipping people to these camps.

MORE . . .

Your Sixth Sense

Perhaps you’ve lived this moment before. Perhaps you’re seeing yourself at a distance, as never before. Anomalous experiences are real and life-changing. That doesn’t mean they occur outside your own head.

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By Matthew Hutson via Psychology Today

Chances are, at some point in your life, you’ve felt someone staring at you. Maybe you were at the grocery store.looking-back-over-my-shoulder_300px Maybe walking along the sidewalk. Maybe sitting on a bus. And sure enough, when you turned your head to look, the suspect’s eyes met yours.

You just had an anomalous experience.

The job of the conscious mind is to form a story out of all our sensations and reflections. Life as we experience it is not just a series of unconnected thoughts and events; it’s a coherent narrative unfolding in an orderly universe. But sometimes we have experiences that don’t fit our expectations and may even contradict what science has taught us is possible. In our attempts to accommodate such outlier phenomena, we often turn to unproven forces or entities. We start to believe in the paranormal.

Anomalous experience of this sort ranges from sensing a strange vibe in a room to feeling outside your own body. We often explain such experiences using concepts related to spirits, luck, witchcraft, psychic powers, life energy, or more terrestrial (and extraterrestrial) entities. Such explanations are often more appealing, or at least more intuitive, than blaming an odd experience on a trick of the mind.

astralt_250pxOne of the most common anomalous experiences is the sense of being stared at. When you see someone gazing directly at you, emotions become activated—it can be exciting or comforting or creepy—and this visceral charge can give the impression that gazes transfer energy. Further, if you feel uncomfortable and check to see whether someone is looking at you, your movement may draw attention—confirming your suspicions.

Another common experience is déjà vu, a phenomenon two in three people report. Most of us shrug it off as a mental hiccup. Indeed, researchers propose it’s a sense of familiarity without a recollection of why something is familiar, or perhaps a timing issue in the brain where thoughts are experienced twice because of a slight wiring delay, lending the second occurrence an odd sensation of repetition. But some people believe it’s a glimpse into a past life.

While anomalous experiences may be associated with stressful circumstances, personal pathologies, or cognitive deficits, the experiences themselves may not always be so bad, and may actually be healthy inventions. They’re just our attempts to make sense of a weird situation. After all, there’s nothing the mind likes better than a good story.

Meaningful Coincidences

photoalbum_250pxAlex and Donna Voutsinas were leafing through family photo albums a week before their wedding in 2002 when one picture caught Alex’s eye. In the foreground was Donna, five years old, posing at Disney World with one of the Seven Dwarves. Behind them was Alex’s father pushing a stroller. And in the stroller was Alex. The boy’s family was visiting from Canada, and the two children would not meet until 15 years later. When he saw the photo, Alex said, “I got chills. It was just too much of a coincidence. It was fate.”

Nearly anyone would get chills in such a situation, but it takes a lot less—hearing the same new word twice in an hour, meeting someone who shares our birthday—to make us pause and say, “Well, how about that!” Such moments occur when we spot patterns, an ability (and compulsion) built into the brain from the earliest stages of perception. Pattern-finding lets us make sense of sensory input (those four legs are part of a table) and to predict regularities in our environment (apples fall down, not up; they’re often tasty; and throwing them makes people mad).

Pattern-finding is so central to survival and success that we see patterns everywhere, even in random data—a phenomenon called apophenia. We spot faces in clouds and hear messages in records played backward. And while we expect some level of order in the world, on occasion our pattern-spotting gets away from us and makes a connection we wouldn’t expect. When that happens, we demand, at least subconsciously, an explanation.

It turns out that our favorite kinds of explanations involve “agents”—beings capable of intentional action. The agent could be a person, a god, or a superintelligent robot. We’re biased to blame even simple events on agents—spotting them or their footprints allows us to manage them if they are dangerous: It is better to mistake a twig for a snake than to mistake a snake for a twig.

MORE . . . .

The Baby-Snatching Eagle: Real or Fake?

By Hany Farid via Image Authentication and Forensics | Fourandsix Technologies

A video purportedly showing an eagle swooping down and snatching a baby has gone viral:

Given how unlikely the video seems, there is a vigorous debate about its authenticity. We performed a forensic lighting analysis on this video to determine if it is real or fake.

To perform this analysis, we connect points on an object with their corresponding cast shadow. Because of the geometry of cast shadows, all such constraints must intersect at a single point. (For an understanding of why this is so, read my previous blog post about shadows.)

Shown below are five such constraints from one frame of the video, just as the eagle is about to the grab the baby. The red lines are from the baby and eagle, and the blue lines are from the slide, adult, and stroller. You can clearly see that these shadows are not consistent with one another. The most likely scenario is that the baby and eagle are computer generated and were inserted into a real-world scene. Because this scene is outdoors and illuminated with a single light source (the sun), there is no physically plausible explanation for this inconsistency in shadows.

[click for a magnified view]

[UPDATE: Minutes after posting this blog entry, we discovered that the perpetrators of the hoax had come forward. They managed to fool much of the internet pretty successfully, but it appears that they can still use some practice in refining their 3D simulations.]

Happy Halloween!!!!

In the spirit of Halloween here are a few hilarious photos of people losing their sh*t in the Nightmares Fear Factory, Niagara Falls Canada. Click a photo to begin viewing. Enjoy🙂


For more hilarious photos and videos of people losing their sh*t click on over to the Nightmares Fear Factory webpage.

Great Halloween Costume – The Ghost of Michael Jackson

Ghost of Michael Jackson

See more great costume photos at the 2012 Halloween Costume Contest.

Photographing Levitations

Posted by Mason I. Bilderberg

This photo is NOT photoshopped.

While working on a recent post (How can parts of Canada be ‘missing’ gravity?) i discovered a type of photography i never knew existed called Levitation Photography.

There are two types of levitation photography. The first kind uses Adobe Photoshop or some other graphics manipulation program to fake the effects we see. Boring.

The second kind of levitation photography is what i’m presenting to you here.

These photographs of levitations are NOT digitally manipulated in any way. These photographs were done by Natsumi Hayashi, a photographer living in Tokyo, Japan. What you see is what Natsumi actually captured with her camera – no digital manipulation.

But how does she do it? (see additional information below the slideshow)

I found these photos absolutely fascinating and i thought you would too. Take a look and enjoy.🙂

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

If you wish to see Natsumi Hayashi’s full collection of self-portrait levitations (and her cat) go here. Natsumi Hayashi explains her technique here.

A photographer not associated with Natsumi Hayashi tries to duplicate her work in a YouTube video located here.

ENJOY!🙂

How can parts of Canada be ‘missing’ gravity?

by via HowStuffWorks

For more than 40 years, scientists have tried to figure out what’s causing large parts of Canada, particularly the Hudson Bay region, to be “missing” gravity. In other words, gravity in the Hudson Bay area and surrounding regions is lower than it is in other parts of the world, a phenomenon first identified in the 1960s when the Earth’s global gravity fields were being charted.

Two theories have been proposed to account for this anomaly. But before we go over them, it’s important to first consider what creates gravity. At a basic level, gravity is proportional to mass. So when the mass of an area is somehow made smaller, gravity is made smaller. Gravity can vary on different parts of the Earth. Although we usually think of it as a ball, the Earth actually bulges at the Equator and gets flatter at the poles due to its rotation. The Earth’s mass is not spread out proportionally, and it can shift position over time. So scientists proposed two theories to explain how the mass of the Hudson Bay area had decreased and contributed to the area’s lower gravity.

Keep Reading: HowStuffWorks “How can parts of Canada be ‘missing’ gravity?”.

A Spiritualist Ghostbuster’s Crystal Skull

A Canadian spiritualist ghostbusting actor walks into a bar wearing New Age crystals and a crystal skull around his neck, goes up to the bartender, and orders a vodka. . . . No, this weird mashup is not the setup to a joke (certainly not a funny one) but instead more or less describes one of the strangest intersections of Hollywood, New Age paranormal belief, ghost hunting, and alcohol.

This story involves crystal skulls. There are many skulls in the world carved out of quartz crystal of varying sizes and designs. I’ve seen them in a lot of places, especially in South and Central America, where they are sold as tourist trinkets. The ones you can buy for a few dollars are rather plain, but the big ones (life-size or so) are steeped in myth and romance. There are only a handful of the life-size skulls in existence, and they have inspired awe for generations. They are said to be hundreds of years old and possibly of Mayan or Aztec origin.

Continue reading: CSI | A Spiritualist Ghostbuster’s Crystal Skull.

Watch The Skies! Study Finds Increase In UFO Sightings In Canada

VANCOUVER, Canada (CBS Seattle) – Although illegal aliens are an issue on our southern border, our neighbor to the north might have its own problem with aliens — from another world.

Ufology Research reports that there were about three UFO sightings per day in Canada, with 986 sightings total last year. The record for UFO sightings was in 2008 when a surprising 1,004 sightings were reported.

The report entitled “The 2011 Canadian UFO Survey” states that “the lion’s share of cases being Nocturnal Lights,” however a number of them were said to be shaped like boomerangs, spheres, and mysterious light sources.

The traditional “flying saucer” style UFO was only sighted about 3 to 4 percent.

However, most of the sightings were explained. Eight out of the 986 sightings are considered “high-quality Unknowns,” or cases with no obvious answer. This is much lower than the 3 to 4 percent of high-quality unknowns from previous years.

Although the public believes that most UFO sightings are made by cranks, the study states that many of the reports of UFOs were “pilots, police and other individuals with reasonably good observing capabilities and good judgment.”

The report admits that the increase in sightings does not have a simple explanation but it offers up a few explanations that are more down to earth.

http://seattle.cbslocal.com/2012/07/26/watch-the-skies-study-finds-increase-in-ufo-sightings-in-canada/

Ouija board helps psychologists probe the subconscious

Beloved of spiritualists and bored teenagers on a dare, the Ouija board has long been a source of entertainment, mystery and sometimes downright spookiness. Now it could shine a light on the secrets of the unconscious mind.

The Ouija, also known as a talking board, is a wooden plaque marked with the words, “yes”, “no” and the letters of the alphabet. Typically a group of users place their hands on a movable pointer , or “planchette”, and ask questions out loud. Sometimes the planchette signals an answer, even when no one admits to moving it deliberately.

Believers think the answer comes through from the spirit world. In fact, all the evidence points to the real cause being the ideomotor effect, small muscle movements we generate unconsciously.

That’s why the Ouija board has attracted the attention of psychologists at the University of British Columbia in Canada. Growing evidence suggests the unconscious plays a role in cognitive functions we usually consider the preserve of the conscious mind.

Keep Reading: Short Sharp Science: Ouija board helps psychologists probe the subconscious.

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