Tag Archives: Great Pyramid of Giza

Secrets of the pyramids

Gordon Bonnetby Gordon Bonnet via Skeptophilia

head_pyramid2_250pxWhat is it with people thinking that pyramids are magical?

I knew a woman a long time ago who was so convinced that there was something special about a square and four equilateral triangles that she built one by hot-gluing together some dowels.  Then she’d store her apples and bananas under it, and told everyone how much longer they stayed unspoiled than if the fruit was just sitting on her counter.

And lo, over at the Self Empowerment and Development Centre, we find out why this is:

Pyramids don’t kill bacteria. However the bacteria feed by absorbing nutrients as entropy breaks the tissues down. In a pyramid there is so little entropy that the bacteria barely survive and don’t multiply prolifically. Food therefore stays fresher longer and has a chance to dehydrate before it goes bad.

So these people not only don’t understand physics, they don’t understand microbiology.  Epic fails in two completely disparate fields.  Quite an accomplishment.

Other claims include the idea that pyramids act as a giant “cosmic battery,” that sleeping underneath a pyramid can cure illness (or at least alleviate insomnia), and that placing a dull razor blade under a pyramid will re-sharpen it.

pyramid animation 730

source: wikimedia

The whole thing has gotten so much traction that it actually made Mythbusters.  They tested a bunch of these claims, with a certified pyramid made to the exact proportions of the Great Pyramid of Giza, and to no one’s particular surprise, none of the claims turned out to be true.

Which makes you wonder why sites like The Secret Power of the Pyramidal Shape still pop up.  This one was sent to me by three different loyal readers of Skeptophilia, and it’s quite a read.  The thing I found the most amusing about it was that it had in-source citations, so it looks a little like an academic paper, but when you check the “Sources Cited” you find out that three of them come from the aforementioned Self Empowerment and Development Centre; one comes from a man named David Wilcock, who claims to be the reincarnation of Edgar Cayce; and one of them comes from Above Top Secret.

Not exactly a bibliography that would inspire confidence.

The site itself is worth reading, though, because it has some fairly surreal passages.  Take, for example, this:

The best passive torsion generators are formed by cones or pyramidal shapes built according to the “phi” ratio of 1 to 0.618 and it can, therefore, be said the pyramid shape has the power to harness torsional energy because torsion waves are phi-spirals and for this reason a pyramid will hold positive energy and deflects negative energy wavelengths and therefore inhibit natural decay.

Okay!  Right!  What?

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5 Things I’ve noticed about… the show “Ancient Aliens”

Via The Soap Box

Ever watch the show “Ancient Aliens“, the History Channel show that claims that humans were visited by aliens in the past? Well I have, and there are some things that I have noticed about that show.

So here are five things I’ve noticed about the show “Ancient Aliens”.

5. Their answer for everything is “Aliens”.

Ancient aliens 823_300pxAccording to the “experts” on that show, almost everything we have built in the ancient world was built by aliens.

It doesn’t matter if it is a giant structure like the Great Pyramid of Giza, or some mundane but interesting object like the Baghdad Battery, or even something that was proven to be made in modern times, such as the Crystal Skulls, according to the experts on the show, they were all either built by aliens, or their construction was guided by aliens.

Heck, even our own existence is, according to them, the result of aliens messing with our genes a long time ago.

4. The “experts” have a “pics, or it didn’t happen” type mentality.

All of the “experts” on that show apparently want exact details about how a megalithic structure was built, and if they don’t have those exact details, they assume that aliens built it, not humans (where as with most scientists or archaeologists, it’s the other way around).

This is somewhat similar to the phrase “pics, or it didn’t happen” where when someone makes a claim on the internet that they did something pretty awesome, if someone is skeptical of the claim they will sometimes say “pics, or it didn’t happen”. Although some might argue that this is more of a reverse of that…

3. They get their facts way wrong.

Many of the “facts” that are presented on that show are just down right wrong. A great example of this would be many of the claims they make about Pumapunku that simply aren’t true.

According to the show Pumapunku is 14,000 years old, when in fact it’s closer to 1,500 years old. Also, according to show, the stone blocks at the site are basalt and granite. In fact the site was constructed using andesite and red sandstone.

MORE . . .

Also see …

Ancient Aliens Debunked

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