Tag Archives: Miami

Nothing supernatural about the Bermuda Triangle, NOAA says

By Ken Kaye via Sun Sentinel

Now it’s official: The Bermuda Triangle is a bunch of bunk.

bermuda-triangle1_300pxFor decades, rumors persisted that hundreds of ships and planes mysteriously vanished in the area between Miami, Puerto Rico and Bermuda because it was cursed or patrolled by extraterrestrials.

Most of us already suspected that was a myth. Yet, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration just posted a story declaring the Devil’s Triangle, as it’s also known, is no different than any other open ocean region — and that foul weather and poor navigation are likely to blame for any mishaps.

“There is no evidence that mysterious disappearances occur with any greater frequency in the Bermuda Triangle than in any other large, well-traveled area of the ocean,” the agency stated this month on noaa.gov.

Ben Sherman, spokesman for NOAA’s National Ocean Service, said the agency wrote the story as part of an educational program where it responds to readers’ questions.

The story was based on information from the U.S. Navy and U.S. Guard, which make no bones about saying the mythological area is so much balderdash.

bermuda-triangle 754_250px“The Coast Guard does not recognize the existence of the so-called Bermuda Triangle as a geographic area of specific hazard to ships or planes,” the military branch said. “In a review of many aircraft and vessel losses in the area over the years, there has been nothing discovered that would indicate that casualties were the result of anything other than physical causes.”

Not everyone is in full agreement, including Minerva Bloom.

She’s a volunteer docent at the Naval Air Station Fort Lauderdale Museum, which pays homage to Flight 19, perhaps the highest-profile incident involving the Bermuda Triangle. The five U.S. Navy torpedo bombers took off from Fort Lauderdale on a routine training exercise in December 1945, never to return.

“I don’t think there are aliens or anything like that, but I do think there’s something going on there,” Bloom said.

MORE – – –

Mystery, Mayhem, and Quantum Physics: The Bermuda Triangle and the Hutchinson Effect

By via Lucid Dreams and Saturn Skies

Well, it was inevitable. Anyone who writes about the weird stuff that happens in this world has to, at some point, tackle two topics: Bigfoot, and the Bermuda Triangle. Not that the two are in anyway related; rather, they’re both arguably the most popular paranormal subjects out there. Usually I try to find more exotic fare for the blog, but when a friend mentioned the Bermuda Triangle in conjunction with something called the Hutchinson Effect, I decided I’d dive in since it was a two-fer.

The Bermuda Triangle is such a facet of pop culture at this point that I won’t spend a ton of time describing it. It is described as a big slice of ocean (between half a million and 1.5 million square miles) that forms, big shock here, a triangle, with the vertices centered in Bermuda, Miami, and San Juan. The Triangle is alleged to be the site of strange phenomena: metallic fogs, strange magnetic disturbances, freak storms, and unexplained lights in the sky. Believers claim that the Triangle swallows ships and planes whole, leaving not a trace for befuddled rescuers to recover.

Believers posit various reasons for the phenomena. Perhaps Atlantis sank beneath the waves under the Triangle, or there’s an alien colony on the sea floor abducting people for nefarious purposes. Since those of us who don’t regularly sport tinfoil hats can easily discount those two, let’s move on to a third, more entertaining option: the Hutchinson Effect.

Known was the H-Effect, it was allegedly discovered by an eccentric inventor named John Hutchinson, who was monkeying around with the various electronic gizmos that he packed his apartment with over the years when, lo and behold,  something (it’s never said what) whacked him in the shoulder! Turns out whatever it was had started levitating due to…something. Something that can also cause unlike materials (metal and wood, for example) to meld together, metals to melt without heat, and other strange phenomena, including metallic fogs similar to those allegedly reported above the Bermuda Triangle.. The best explanation that supporters can come up with for the alleged effect is that scalar waves tap into zero point energy, thus producing the phenomena observed. How exactly that happens, they have no explanation.

MORE . . .

Science VS Scientology [infographic]

via relativelyinteresting.com

Ah, Scientology, the pseudo-religion/cult built on a premise straight out of science fiction. It’s mind boggling to think that Scientology has as large a following as it does, and even more upsetting that celebrities continue to endorse its ideals.

This infographic, courtesy of Visual.ly gives the low-down on Scientology – from it’s strange beginnings through to its ongoing legal battles.


Image Source: http://visual.ly/things-you-dont-know-about-scientology

Past Life Regression (PLR)

via The Skeptic’s Dictionary

PLR 815_02_250pxPast life regression (PLR) is the alleged journeying into one’s past lives while hypnotized. While it is true that many patients recall past lives, it is highly probable that their memories are false memories. The memories are from experiences in this life, pure products of the imagination, intentional or unintentional suggestions from the hypnotist, or confabulations.

Some New Age therapists do PLR therapy under the guise of personal growth; others under the guise of healing. As a tool for New Age explorers, there may be little harm in encouraging people to remember what are probably false memories about their living in earlier centuries or for encouraging them to go forward in time and glimpse into the future. But as a method of healing, it must be apparent even to the most superficial of therapists that there are great dangers in encouraging patients to create delusions. Some false memories may be harmless, but others can be devastating. They can increase a person’s suffering, as well as destroy loving relationships with family members. The care with which hypnosis should be used seems obvious.

Door to mystical UniverseSome therapists think hypnosis opens a window to the unconscious mind where memories of past lives are stored. How memories of past lives get into the unconscious mind of a person is not known, but advocates loosely adhere to a doctrine of reincarnation, even though such a doctrine does not require a belief in the unconscious mind as a reservoir of memories of past lives.

PLR therapists claim that past life regression is essential to healing and helping their patients. Some therapists claim that past life therapy can help even those who don’t believe in past lives. The practice is given undeserved credibility because of the credentials of some of its leading advocates, e.g., Brian L. Weiss, M.D., who is a graduate of Columbia University and Yale Medical School and Chairman Emeritus of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami. There are no medical internships in PLR therapy, nor does being a medical doctor grant one special authority in metaphysics, the occult or the supernatural.

MORE . . . .

Was Alex Jones an alarmist 13 years ago or is he an alarmist today?

Feb 11, 2013

Recently i was sent an email by a conspiracist type asking me how some military exercises conducted during the spring and summer of 2012 weren’t undeniably clear indications of a coming declaration of martial law.

I decided to investigate. To get you up to speed, here are two examples of what he was talking about.

Miami, Florida (April 2012):

As we would expect, this exercise over Miami prompted the loons over at Alex Jones’ InfoWars to write knee-jerk, alarmist headlines like:

«Coming Martial Law? U.S. military conducts ‘realistic urban training’ exercise in Miami»

• Minneapolis, Minnesota (August 2012):

In response to the Minneapolis exercise, again like Pavlov’s dog, Alex Jones’ InfoWars set off the alarm bells:

«Black Hawk military helicopters are flying low over Minneapolis this week as part of an exercise being overseen by the U.S. Special Operations Command, increasing concerns that Americans are being prepared for a state of martial law.


«As we have previously highlighted, unannounced urban warfare operations of this kind are being used to condition the public into accepting a future declaration of martial law

Now to answer my conspiracist’s question, i decided to take a different tact than he expected. He expected me to tackle every example of a military exercise he can throw at me. In conspiratorial circles, trying to overwhelm naysayers with a flood of questions and data is a common tactic called proof by verbosity:

«Proof by verbosity, sometimes colloquially referred to as argumentum verbosum – a rhetorical technique that tries to persuade by overwhelming those considering an argument with such a volume of material that the argument sounds plausible, superficially appears to be well-researched, and it is so laborious to untangle and check supporting facts that the argument might be allowed to slide by unchallenged.»

So if you want to become a conspiracist, be sure to master the art of cut-and-paste. You’ll win every time.

To the conspiracists’ mind, if you can’t answer every one of their million questions or if you just can’t be bothered responding to every anomaly they’ve found in a Bugs Bunny cartoon, your lack of response validates their delusions. This is called argument from ignorance:

«Argument from ignorance, also known as argumentum ad ignorantiam or “appeal to ignorance” (where “ignorance” stands for: “lack of evidence to the contrary”), is a fallacy in informal logic. It asserts that a proposition is true because it has not yet been proven false, it is “generally accepted” (or vice versa).»

In other words, if you don’t know the sum of “2 + 2”, the conspiracist believes he is free to declare the correct answer is “666”! Illuminati!!!!

I decided the best way to tackle his question was to turn the tables on him. I have found one of the best ways to combat a conspiracy theory is to pit it against a competing conspiracy theory. This forces the conspiracy theorist to explain to ME why their theory is more valid than the competing theory.

AlexJonesLunaticAs an example, in my video “9/11: Were Explosives Used?” i show buildings collapsing in identical fashion as the World Trade Centers on 9/11, except the buildings in my video are collapsed without using explosives. This puts the 9/11 truthers in the awkward position of defending their belief that explosives were used on 9/11 in lieu of the method used in my video. Awwwwwwwkward.

When a truther wants to discuss the aircraft used on 9/11, point out the other two, competing theories: no planes were used on 9/11 and drones were used on 9/11. Then ask him why these other competing theores are invalid. Sit back with a bucket of popcorn and watch the brain freeze.

Back to the military exercises during the spring and summer of 2012 …

The first thing i asked myself is, has this ever happend before? The conspiracists played up the significance of these exercises as unique, unusual and shocking and therefore evidence of something panic worthy. So i figured i’d research the history of such exercises. As it turns out, these exercises in April and August weren’t the first exercises of this nature:

• In February – World Net Daily – Kingsville, Texas:

«Some residents said they were terrified when helicopters swooped into town from the Army Special Operations Command, Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, last Monday night.
«At least eight helicopters are reported to have participated in an assault exercise using live ammunition and explosives very close to innocent bystanders who were not warned of the planned action.
«The Army Special Operations Command at Ft. Bragg, North Carolina, has acknowledged that the event was the kick-off of a series of similar training operations going on in Kingsville, Corpus Christi and Fort Sam Houston, but would not confirm that the group was the Knight Stalkers. Additional training events have been confirmed in the area. »

• In March – The Anniston Star – Oxford, Alabama:

«Friday evening the Williams family sat down in their Oxford living room and popped a movie into the VCR. Then the power went off — a total blackout in all the neighborhoods surrounding the Anniston Municipal Airport in Oxford — and what sounded like a war began outside.
«Residents near the airport heard what sounded like machine gun fire, saw the fiery-red flash of explosions, and saw silhouettes of what looked like paratroopers dropping out of the darkened skies.
«The “invasion” was part of a special training operation conducted in Anniston, at Fort McClellan and at the airport in Oxford from Tuesday until the wee hours of Saturday morning.
«She said the Army does exercises like this “to give the rangers, Air Force special operations and the 160th opportunities to experience training in new and different environments. It adds to the realism of the exercise as real-world missions are in environments unfamiliar to our soldiers.” »

• In May – Richmond, Virginia TIMES-DISPATCH:

«A planned Marine Corps training exercise in Richmond has some Virginians worried about secretive encroachments on civil liberties, accident hazards, and misguided use of the American military. The urban maneuvers, these worried citizens say, may mask preparations for a Year 2000 computer meltdown so great that governments are afraid to discuss it, or plans to confiscate firearms, or the groundwork for a presidential power grab.
«The Marines and governments that have worked with the service on other exercises say the Marines are just getting ready to deal with crises that take them into increasingly dangerous urban areas overseas. . . .
«The bottom line, the Marines’ White said, “is we’re doing this training to save lives, the lives of our Marines. “The allegation that we’re doing anything other than that couldn’t be farther from the truth.”»

See? These kinds of military operations have happened before. But wait! There’s a catch! These three additional military operations – ALL OCCURRED IN 1999!!![a][b][c]

Let The 1999 Alarmism Begin!!!

Just like today, the conspiracists’ reaction to these 1999 military exercises was the same old, tired, over-hyped, alarmist rhetoric from the usual crazies at InfoWars:

Banner from infowars - 2000

Banner from infowars – 1999


Original source URL: http://www.infowars.com/journalism.html (Expired)
Archive URL: http://tinyurl.com/bzwowyl (archive.org)
PDF File

1999 alarmism continues: (Click any image to begin viewing)

Photo References: [1], [2], [3], [4], [5]

References [1] thru [5] (directly above) in zipped PDF format: [1-5] Archive

And of course the panicked alarmism by the loons rolled right into the the year 2000. Here are just a few screen shots from InfoWars in 2000. Click any image to begin viewing:

Photo references (archive.org):
[1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]

References [1] thru [9] (directly above) in zipped PDF format: [1-9] Archive

You see, martial law has been coming for over 13 years now!!!! A herd of turtles could invade a country quicker.

Getting back to my tactic of pitting one conspiracy theory against another, i ask my conspiratorial friend this question:

Was Alex Jones an alarmist 13 years
ago or is he an alarmist today?

I’ll be eating my popcorn awaiting your answer.


References [a] thru [c] (directly above) in zipped PDF format: [a-c] Archive

Also See: Black Hawks Conducting Urban Training Exercise (MetaBunk)

Posted in: Alex Jones, Apocalypse, Conspiracy, Doomsday, False Flag, FEMA Camps, Government, New World Order, Paranoid, Secret Societies. Tagged: 9/11 Truth movement, Alex Jones, conspiracy theory, Fort Bragg, Miami, Minneapolis, Sandy Hook, United States.

The Bermuda Triangle and the Devil’s Sea

Two regions of ocean are said to be mysteriously dangerous. What’s the truth behind this popular belief?

via Skeptoid.com
Podcast Listen | Subscribe

Today we’re going to hit the high seas, and venture into a matched pair of alleged danger zones where ships and airplanes are said to disappear at an alarming rate. Some believe that the Bermuda Triangle and its twin, the Devil’s Sea south of Japan, are merely regions where natural forces combine to form a genuine navigational hazard; while others believe that some unknown agent is responsible for sweeping the hapless travelers from the face of the Earth. Today we’re going to dive into the waters to see how deep the mysteries really are. Let’s begin with:

The Bermuda Triangle

trianglemapIt’s perhaps the best known of all the world’s regions said to be strangely treacherous. The triangle goes from Miami to Bermuda to Puerto Rico, and despite a huge amount of normal shipping traffic passing through it every day, stories persist that some force there lurks to pull ships and planes to a watery grave.

The most common appearance of the Bermuda Triangle today is on television documentaries and popular books that purport to take a “science-based” look at the phenomenon. They give the appearance of skepticism by dismissing the paranormal explanations like psychic energy, Atlantis, or alien abductions, and instead focus on natural phenomena that could be responsible for disappearances. These include rogue waves, undersea methane explosions, or strange geomagnetic fluctuations. They test these explanations with scale models and sophisticated simulations.

But in fact, this representation of being scientific is wrong. To investigate the Bermuda Triangle scientifically, we would start with an observation, and then test hypotheses to explain it. Popular programming today tends to skip the very first step: actually having an observation to explain.

One of the first things you learn when researching the Bermuda Triangle responsibly — which means including source material beyond the TV shockumentaries and pulp paperbacks that promote the mystery wholeheartedly — is that transportation losses inside the Bermuda Triangle do not occur at a rate higher than anywhere else, and the number of losses that are unexplained is also not any higher. Statistically speaking, there is no Bermuda Triangle. The books and TV shows are trying to explain an imaginary observation. MORE . . .

The Devil’s Sea

bermuda-triangle1_300pxIt goes by many names: the Devil’s Sea, the Dragon’s Triangle, and the Taiwan Triangle; and, just as is the Bermuda Triangle, it’s even sometimes called the Devil’s Triangle. Its location varies a bit depending on which author you read, but the triangle usually runs from Taiwan up to the volcanic island of Miyake-jima just south of Tokyo, to about Iwo-jima or thereabouts. Miyake-jima and Iwo-jima lie along the Izu-Bonin volcanic arc, a line of underwater volcanoes and islands that’s part of a system stretching 2500 kilometers from Japan to Guam. Some, like Charles Berlitz, say that the Devil’s Sea is every bit as dangerous and mysterious as the Bermuda Triangle.

In his 1989 book The Dragon’s Triangle, Berlitz said that Japan lost five military vessels in the area between 1952 and 1954 alone, with a loss of some 700 sailors. In Dan Cohen’s 1974 book Curses, Hexes, & Spells it’s reported that legends of the danger of the Devil’s Sea go back for centuries in Japan. Its most famous casualty was the No. 5 Kaiyo-Maru, a scientific research vessel, which disappeared with the loss of all hands on September 24, 1953 (a date often wrongly reported as 1952 or 1958).

With such a dramatic history, you’d expect there to be all sorts of books on the subject, especially in Japan. But it turns out that the eager researcher is disappointed. A search for books, newspaper, or magazine articles on the Devil’s Sea comes up completely empty, until a full 20 years after the loss of the Kaiyo-Maru. Apparently, the story — even the very existence of this legendary named region — was not invented until very recently. MORE . . .

10 Explanations for the Bermuda Triangle

by Flamehorse via listverse.com

The classic borders of the Bermuda Triangle are from Bermuda to Miami, Florida to San Juan, Puerto Rico. Most of the mysterious disasters have occurred in its southern region from the Florida straits into the Bahamas. Well over a hundred sea and aircraft have vanished or been destroyed in the area, taking with them over a thousand men, women, and children, and no one yet knows why.

#10 – Plain Old Human Error

Because it isn’t exactly a dramatic revelation, human error makes only 10th place (they get more interesting). In terms of probability, those who have no interest in the supernatural — or as yet misunderstood science — will usually stop with all the ships and planes wrecking in the Triangle as a result solely of human error.

Humans make a lot of them. Even the most well trained, seasoned pilot’s concentration can momentarily lapse, and that is sometimes all it takes for disaster.

Keep Reading: 10 Explanations for the Bermuda Triangle.

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