Tag Archives: Missouri

Look-Alike UFOs Videotaped Over Missouri And Arizona (VIDEO)

FBI Alien Ufos

By via The huffington Post

Whatever it was over the skies of Tucson, Ariz. and Kansas City, Mo., eyewitnesses in both cities agree — it was quite a show.

ufo 835_200pxUnusual displays of lights were reported in both cities on Saturday night, giving rise to UFO chatter.

According to one eyewitness, identified as Cbazz on YouTube: “My family and I witnessed these strange amber lights in Tucson on our way home from dinner. There were seven or eight of them crossing the sky, some solo and others in pairs flying very, very close together.

Watch the UFOs videotaped over Tucson.

“Living in this part of the country, we often hear fighter jets from the Air Force base, but we are used to that and it is always recognizable and very loud,” Cbazz wrote.

“These objects we saw tonight were silent and moving across the sky very fast….Not sure what we were seeing, but I never really believed in this sort of thing until tonight. Glad I had my phone to record.”

Several eyewitnesses saw and videotaped similar objects in the sky — but this time, they were flying over Kansas City, Mo.

Watch the Kansas City UFOs here.

“Not for sure what they are, but I got several videos of them and pics. Looks like a UFO fleet!?” wrote YouTube poster jemnich1, who was contacted by another witness, GoGraveside, who sent this message on YouTube: “I really hope you get to investigate this incident. I was in the same vicinity and recorded the same lights on my cell phone. There were 3 additional passengers in my vehicle at the time who witnessed the ‘lights’ as well.”

So, what were these folks looking at from different parts of the country? Or does it just get buried in those numerous reports that are never adequately explained?

“In my opinion both videos are definitely . . .

. . . MORE . . .

Is that a FEMA Camp? – June 9, 2013 Edition

Is that a FEMA Camp? is a blog dedicated to investigating claims of FEMA camp locations.
Below is some of their findings. Enjoy🙂

June 9, 2013 Edition

Black Hills Nat’l Forest, South Dakota

3989_20015_Black_Hills_National_Forest_md_200pxThe claim: north of Edgemont, southwest part of state. WWII internment camp being renovated.What it really is: A bogus claim. There are neither any Japanese internment camps, nor POW camps located in the state of South Dakota.

Warsaw, Missouri

The claim: Unconfirmed report of a large concentration camp facility.What it really is: Using Google maps the largest facilities that I found there was a Walmart and a U-Haul dealer. Nothing there even comes close to looking like a FEMA camp.

Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri

The claim: Situated in the middle of Mark Twain National Forest in Pulaski County. This site has been known for some UN training, also home to the US Army Urban Warfare Training school “Stem Village”.What it really is: Fort Leonard Wood has not hosted any training for UN troops, or any other foreign troops here, nor does it host urban combat training, although it is used for the Army Police Corps training.

afb_250pxRichards-Gebaur AFB, Missouri

The claim: located in Grandview, near K.C.MO. A very large internment facility has been built on this base, and all base personnel are restricted from coming near it.What it really is: This Air Force base was closed down in 1994. A few companies do use the site, but much of it is now the in a deteriorating state.

Oakdale, Louisiana

The claim: Located on US route 165 about 50 miles south of Alexandria; two federal detention centers just southeast of Fort Polk.What it really is: There are in fact two Federal detention centers here. One is called the Federal Correctional Institution, Oakdale, and houses low security inmates.The other one is called the Federal Detention Center, Oakdale, and houses male hold over inmates, pre-trial inmates, and minimum security inmates in a prison camp.

Livingston, Louisiana

The claim: WWII German/Italian internment camp being renovated?; halfway between Baton Rouge and Hammond, several miles north of Interstate 12.What it really is: The World War Two interment camp (known as Camp Livingston) was shut down in 1945. The site of the camp is now run by the U.S. Forest Service, and is open to the public for any one who wishes to explore the site and see what remains.

Ft. Polk, Louisiana

Welcome to Fort Polk_200px

The claim: This is a main base for UN troops & personnel, and a training center for the disarmament of America.

What it really is: Fort Polk is an army and National Guard training base. The land on which Fort Polk is on also has multiple historical and archaeological sites located on it as well, information of which can be found here.

Click here for the latest findings at “Is that a FEMA Camp?”

Sylvia Browne’s Biggest Blunder

By Ben Radford via The Committee for Skeptical Inquiry – CSI

From June 2007

The tragic consequences of listening to psychic advice were brought into sharp focus in January 2007, when yet another psychic vision from Sylvia Browne was revealed to be wrong.

Why don't you remember this headline?

Why don’t you remember this headline?

Several years ago during one of her many appearances on the Montel Williams show, Browne told the parents of missing child Shawn Hornbeck that their son was dead. His body, she said, would be found in a wooded area near two large boulders. Furthermore, according to Browne, Hornbeck was kidnapped by a very tall, “dark-skinned man, he wasn’t Black, more like Hispanic,” who wore dreadlocks.

According to a spokesman for the Hornbeck family, following the Montel broadcast Browne tried to get money from the family: “She called Pam and Craig about one month after the show and pretty much offered her services to continue their discussion for a fee. Pam was that desperate that if she had had $700 in her bank account she would have put it on the table. We are talking about a mother who would have sold her soul to have her boy back.”

In fact, Hornbeck and another boy were found very much alive January 16, 2007, in the home of Michael Devlin, a Missouri man accused of kidnapping them. Hornbeck had been missing for four years, but his parents had not given up hope of finding him despite Browne’s misinformation. Devlin, a Caucasian, is not Black, dark-skinned, nor Hispanic and almost certainly did not have dreadlocks at the time he allegedly abducted Hornbeck.

Within days of Hornbeck’s recovery, critics such as James “The Amazing” Randi spoke out against Browne. CNN’s Anderson Cooper featured Randi and gave refreshingly skeptical (and harsh) coverage of the case, calling attention to Browne’s highest-profile failure to date. Browne, in a statement posted on her Web site, responded to the criticism, stating that “I have never nor ever will charge anyone who seeks my help regarding a missing person or homicide. In these cases I choose to work strictly with law enforcement agencies involved to aid and not impede their work and only when asked. To be accused of otherwise by James Randi and others like him is a boldface [sic] lie. . . . If the brilliant scientists throughout history had a James Randi negating every aspect of their work, I doubt we would have progressed very far in medicine or in any technology. . . . I cannot possibly be 100 percent correct in each and every one of my predictions.”

Yet her documented track record is one of nearly 100 percent failure rate instead of 100 percent success. Browne’s confidence in her body of work is baffling, and her claim that her flawed visions were “one human error” is an amazing understatement.

Also see:

Where’s the science in the search for Sasquatch?

The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Agency recently issued a statement indicating it knew of no evidence of the existence of “aquatic humanoids.”

This remarkable statement was prompted by calls from viewers of Animal Planet’s “Mermaids: the Body Found,” which claimed such creatures exist. A swarm of television programs, listed as “scientific” and “reality based,” perpetuate similar pseudoscientific ideas that are gobbled up by viewers, especially kids.

This incident illustrates a dangerous trend: Viewers’ acceptance of claims made by untrained laypeople as authoritative, and their simultaneous rejection of work done by experts in science, history and politics. This idea argues that egg-headed specialists — with a lifetime of focused academic work, peer-reviewed scholarship and study — are hiding the “truth” from us so that the only way to get answers is from down-home folks with little schooling but good sense. In other words, formal education is bad.

Keep Reading: Where’s the science in the search for Sasquatch? | NJ.com.

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