Tag Archives: Netherlands

10 Interesting Cases Of Supposed Reincarnation

Sabine Bevers via Listverse

Even though reincarnation stories can never really be proven true, some of them have elements that are genuinely mind-boggling, especially when the stories come from children too young to have much knowledge of the world.

10 • Edward Austrian

WWII-e1382251658515_250pxPatricia Austrian’s four-year-old son Edward had a phobia of drizzly, grey days. Then he developed a problem with his throat and started to complain of severe pain. Whenever he had a sore throat, he said that his “shot was hurting.” Edward told his mother very detailed stories about his previous life in the trenches in what was apparently World War I. He told her that he had been shot in the throat and killed.

At first doctors could not find a cause for his sore throat and removed his tonsils as a precautionary measure. A cyst developed in his throat and doctors did not know how to treat it. As soon as Edward was prompted to tell his parents and others more about his previous life and talk about how he was killed, the cyst disappeared. Edward’s doctors never found out why the cyst had vanished.

9 • The Dutch Clock

Clock-e1382251703326_250pxBruce Whittier had reoccurring dreams of being a Jewish man hiding in a house with his family. His name had been Stefan Horowitz, a Dutch Jew who was discovered in his hiding place along with his family and taken to Auschwitz, where he died. During and after the dreams, he felt panicked and restless. He began to record his dreams, and one night he dreamed about a clock, which he was able to draw in great detail upon waking.

Whittier dreamed about the location of the clock in an antiques shop and went to look. The clock was visible in the shop window and looked exactly like the one in his dreams. Whittier asked the dealer where it had come from. It transpired that the dealer had bought the clock from among the property of a retired German major in The Netherlands. This convinced Whittier that he really had led a past life.

8 • John Raphael And The Tower Tree

Scottish-e1382251765904_250pxPeter Hume, a bingo caller from Birmingham, England, started having a very specific dreams about life on guard duty at the Scottish border in 1646. He was a foot soldier of Cromwell’s army and his name was John Raphael. When put under hypnosis, Hume remembered more details and locations. He started to visit places he remembered with his brother and even found small items that appeared to have come from the era in which he had lived, such as horse spurs.

With the help of a village historian in Culmstock, South England, he even managed to positively identify details about a church that he had known—he was able to tell her that the church used to have a tower with a yew tree growing from it. This was not a published fact, and it startled her that Hume knew it—the church tower had been taken down in 1676. In local registers, John Raphael was discovered to have been married in the church. A civil war historian, Ronald Hutton, investigated the case and asked Hume very era-specific questions while under hypnosis. Hutton was not satisfied that Hume was totally in tune with the era of his past life, as he could not answer all his questions in a satisfactory way.

7 • Who’s Your Grandad?

Old-and-young-e1382251809384_250pxGus Taylor was 18 months old when he started to say that he was his own grandfather. Young children can be confused about their own identity and those of their family members, but this was different. His grandfather had died a year before Gus was born and the boy totally believed they were the same person. When shown some family photographs, Gus identified “Grandpa Augie” when he was four years old.

There was a family secret that nobody had ever spoken about in front of or around Gus—Augie’s sister had been murdered and dumped in the San Francisco Bay. The family were perplexed when the four-year-old child started to talk about his dead sister. According to Gus, God gave him a ticket after he died. With this ticket he was able to travel through a hole, after which he came back to life as Gus.

6 • The Case Of Imad Elawar

Spiral-e1382251860451_250pxFive-year-old Imad Elawar from Lebanon started talking about his life in a nearby village. The first two words he spoke as a child were the names “Jamileh” and “Mahmoud,” and at the age of two he stopped stranger outside and told him they had been neighbors. The child and his parents were investigated by Dr Ian Stevenson. Imad made over 55 different claims about his previous life.

The family visited the village that the boy had been spoken of, together with Stevenson, and found the house where he claimed he had lived. Imad and his family were able to positively identify thirteen facts and memories that were confirmed as being accurate. Imad recognized his previous uncle, Mahmoud, and his mistress from a former life, Jamileh, from photographs. He was able to remember where he had kept his gun, a fact verified by others, and was able to have a chat with a stranger about their experiences during their army days. In total, 51 out of 57 of the experiences and places mentioned by Imad were verified during the visit.

MORE – – – Listverse

Dominoes: More Powerful Than You Think

top_dominoes

In this image, the National Dutch Science Quiz starts a domino chain reaction that
will topple the towering 26-foot tall, half-ton domino to the left.

Image credit: Dutch National Sciencequiz of public broadcaster VPRO
Rights information: http://bit.ly/WyFBkA

By: Sean Treacy, ISNS Contributor, via Inside Science

(ISNS) — Could a domino small enough to hold in your hand cause a chain reaction that could topple something as big as 112-meter tall tower? It sounds like a plot hatched by a kooky domino-themed super villain, but a new mathematical model shows it’s theoretically possible.

A typical domino is just under 2 inches tall, 1 inch wide, and about one-quarter of an inch thick. These dimensions create a thin block that’s just stable enough to stand upright yet unstable enough to fall over with the slightest nudge.

“If you make them too thick, for instance if you had dominoes like cubes, they would never [fall],” said physicist Hans van Leeuwen of Leiden University in the Netherlands.

Each upright domino is also full of potential energy. When the first domino falls, the force of gravity turns that potential energy into enough kinetic energy to topple a domino larger than itself. That taller, heavier domino stores even more potential energy, and that energy will continue to mount so long as each falling domino’s kinetic energy can overcome the potential energy of their more massive neighbors.

Mathematicians have traditionally assumed that no domino could knock over a neighboring domino more than about one-and-a-half-times its own width, height, and thickness, or a “growth factor” of 1.5. But there was no overarching mathematical model. So, when last year’s annual Dutch National Science Quiz TV Show, run by public broadcaster VPRO, asked how many dominoes it would take to topple a domino the size of the 112-meter-tall Domtoren — the tallest church tower in the Netherlands — van Leeuwen set out to calculate just how much punch a falling domino packs.

But falling dominoes are deceptively complex.

MORE . . .


The above video from The National Dutch Science Quiz demonstrates how a sequence of dominoes can be arranged to topple a very large block.

European Agency’s Final Verdict on Controversial GM Study: Not Scientifically Sound

via ScienceInsider

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Corn fed. Controversial study had suggested GM maize fed to rats caused tumors.
Credit: Janet Stephens/Wikimedia Commons

The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) today delivered its final verdict on a controversial study that examined the toxicity of genetically modified (GM) maize. The study “does not meet acceptable scientific standards” and there is therefore no need to reevaluate the safety of GM maize, the group concluded.

The study in question was published on 19 September in Food and Chemical Toxicology by molecular biologist Gilles-Eric Séralini and colleagues. It claimed to find a link between GM maize NK603 and tumors and death in rats. Although the study was panned by scientists, it received an enormous amount of attention from both the French public and press.

At the request of the European Commission, EFSA set up a task force to look into the study; an initial review on 4 October deemed the research “inconclusive.” Two French regulatory bodies also came to a similar conclusion in October.

Now, after completing its own assessment as well as taking into account independent assessments from Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, and the Netherlands, EFSA has found the Seralini study wanting. The study is “of insufficient scientific quality for risk assessment” due to “inadequacies in the design, reporting and analysis of the study,” the agency says.

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